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US ends protections for Salvadoran immigrants, sparking fear

AP  |  Washington 

The Trump administration's decision to end special protections for about 200,0000 Salvadoran immigrants filled many Salvadoran families with dread Monday, raising the possibility that they will be forced to abandon their roots in the US and return to a violent homeland they have not known for years, even decades.

gave with temporary protected status until Sept. 9, 2019, to leave the or face deportation.

becomes the fourth country since took office to lose protection under the program, which provides humanitarian relief for people whose countries are hit with natural disasters or other strife.

The decision, while not surprising, was a severe blow to in New York, Houston, and other major cities that have welcomed them since at least the 1980s.

Guillermo Mendoza, who came to the in 2000 when he was 19 years old, was anguished about what to do with his wife and two children who are US citizens.

"What do I do? Do I leave the country and leave them here? That is a tough decision," said Mendoza, a safety manager at Shapiro & Duncan, a mechanical company in Rockville, Maryland, near

Orlando Zepeda, who came to the US in 1984 fleeing civil war in El Salvador, said the lack of surprise does not ease the sting for the 51-year-old Los Angeles-area man who works in building maintenance and has two American-born children.

"It's sad, because it's the same story of family separation from that time, and now history repeats itself with my children," said in Spanish.

Many immigrants hope can deliver a long-term reprieve by September 2019. If that fails, they face a grim choice: return to voluntarily or live in the US illegally under an administration that has dramatically increased deportation arrests.

Cristian Chavez Guevara, a 37-year-old Salvadoran immigrant in who is raising two American stepchildren and a young cousin, said the decision would tear apart his family. He was unsure what to do.

"I have been building dreams for the future and raising hope for a better future not just for me but for my family," he said. "All of that came to a halt."

The action presents a serious challenge for El Salvador, a country of 6.2 million people whose economy counts on money sent by wage earners in the US Over the past decade, growing numbers of many coming as families or unaccompanied children have entered the illegally through Mexico, fleeing violence and poverty.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

First Published: Tue, January 09 2018. 13:25 IST