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Busted: Common Myths About Organ Donation

Organ donation often evokes mixed feelings in people

Busted: Common Myths About Organ Donation

Organ donation often evokes mixed feelings in people – while some think of it as a noble act, many still hold fears regarding donation. While it can be hard to think about your body after you are no longer living, organ donation is a generous act that can prove to be equivalent to a second life after the end of yours. 

If you too believe in the several myths surrounding donation and have never seriously considered it, have a look at the below information to accurately answer your concerns. We bust some common organ donation myths for you:

Organ donation is against my religion:

This is one of the most common myths floating around. The fact is, almost all religions support organ and tissue donation, viewing it as perhaps the highest act of compassion. Look at any major religion - Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism - all support donation. The organ donation process will almost always align with your religious requirements.
 
Organ donation disfigures the body:

Most people continue to believe that organ donation leaves their body mutilated. However, it is a deeply specialized surgery performed by skilled professionals and does nothing to disfigure the body. The surgical incision made as part of the operation is closed and is thus not visible beneath the person's clothes. Even after life has left the donor’s body, it is always treated with dignity.
 
If I register as a donor, doctors won’t try hard to save my life:

The doctor’s first priority, always, is to save a patient’s life, donor or not. The fear that a doctor may not try as hard to save a donor’s life is unfounded. Medical staff – doctors, nurses etc. – are trained to work incredibly hard to save lives and organ donation comes into the picture only when death looks inevitable and certain, or the person has already died. 
 
Enough people donate so I don’t need to:

Every year, several people die waiting for a transplant. Owing to the myths and misconceptions surrounding donation, most people remain unwilling to donate. However, this attitude sees a shift when they or a family member needed a transplant. If we expect to receive a transplant in times of need, then we must also be prepared to donate. Don’t put off making this decision by citing enough people already donate - register your online donation decision today.
 
I'm too old to donate:

Age is certainly not a barrier to donating - people over 80 have become donors. People in their 70s and 80s are known to have saved the lives of others through organ donation. 

Now that you have the facts, register for an online donation and make a difference to someone’s life. Your decision to donate can save or improve as many as 50 lives. 

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Busted: Common Myths About Organ Donation

Organ donation often evokes mixed feelings in people

Organ donation often evokes mixed feelings in people
Organ donation often evokes mixed feelings in people – while some think of it as a noble act, many still hold fears regarding donation. While it can be hard to think about your body after you are no longer living, organ donation is a generous act that can prove to be equivalent to a second life after the end of yours. 

If you too believe in the several myths surrounding donation and have never seriously considered it, have a look at the below information to accurately answer your concerns. We bust some common organ donation myths for you:

Organ donation is against my religion:

This is one of the most common myths floating around. The fact is, almost all religions support organ and tissue donation, viewing it as perhaps the highest act of compassion. Look at any major religion - Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism - all support donation. The organ donation process will almost always align with your religious requirements.
 
Organ donation disfigures the body:

Most people continue to believe that organ donation leaves their body mutilated. However, it is a deeply specialized surgery performed by skilled professionals and does nothing to disfigure the body. The surgical incision made as part of the operation is closed and is thus not visible beneath the person's clothes. Even after life has left the donor’s body, it is always treated with dignity.
 
If I register as a donor, doctors won’t try hard to save my life:

The doctor’s first priority, always, is to save a patient’s life, donor or not. The fear that a doctor may not try as hard to save a donor’s life is unfounded. Medical staff – doctors, nurses etc. – are trained to work incredibly hard to save lives and organ donation comes into the picture only when death looks inevitable and certain, or the person has already died. 
 
Enough people donate so I don’t need to:

Every year, several people die waiting for a transplant. Owing to the myths and misconceptions surrounding donation, most people remain unwilling to donate. However, this attitude sees a shift when they or a family member needed a transplant. If we expect to receive a transplant in times of need, then we must also be prepared to donate. Don’t put off making this decision by citing enough people already donate - register your online donation decision today.
 
I'm too old to donate:

Age is certainly not a barrier to donating - people over 80 have become donors. People in their 70s and 80s are known to have saved the lives of others through organ donation. 

Now that you have the facts, register for an online donation and make a difference to someone’s life. Your decision to donate can save or improve as many as 50 lives. 

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Business Standard
177 22

Busted: Common Myths About Organ Donation

Organ donation often evokes mixed feelings in people

Organ donation often evokes mixed feelings in people – while some think of it as a noble act, many still hold fears regarding donation. While it can be hard to think about your body after you are no longer living, organ donation is a generous act that can prove to be equivalent to a second life after the end of yours. 

If you too believe in the several myths surrounding donation and have never seriously considered it, have a look at the below information to accurately answer your concerns. We bust some common organ donation myths for you:

Organ donation is against my religion:

This is one of the most common myths floating around. The fact is, almost all religions support organ and tissue donation, viewing it as perhaps the highest act of compassion. Look at any major religion - Christianity, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, Judaism - all support donation. The organ donation process will almost always align with your religious requirements.
 
Organ donation disfigures the body:

Most people continue to believe that organ donation leaves their body mutilated. However, it is a deeply specialized surgery performed by skilled professionals and does nothing to disfigure the body. The surgical incision made as part of the operation is closed and is thus not visible beneath the person's clothes. Even after life has left the donor’s body, it is always treated with dignity.
 
If I register as a donor, doctors won’t try hard to save my life:

The doctor’s first priority, always, is to save a patient’s life, donor or not. The fear that a doctor may not try as hard to save a donor’s life is unfounded. Medical staff – doctors, nurses etc. – are trained to work incredibly hard to save lives and organ donation comes into the picture only when death looks inevitable and certain, or the person has already died. 
 
Enough people donate so I don’t need to:

Every year, several people die waiting for a transplant. Owing to the myths and misconceptions surrounding donation, most people remain unwilling to donate. However, this attitude sees a shift when they or a family member needed a transplant. If we expect to receive a transplant in times of need, then we must also be prepared to donate. Don’t put off making this decision by citing enough people already donate - register your online donation decision today.
 
I'm too old to donate:

Age is certainly not a barrier to donating - people over 80 have become donors. People in their 70s and 80s are known to have saved the lives of others through organ donation. 

Now that you have the facts, register for an online donation and make a difference to someone’s life. Your decision to donate can save or improve as many as 50 lives. 

image
Business Standard
177 22