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Federer reveals preferred venue for retirement

Swiss tennis maestro Roger Federer has revealed that Wimbledon, where he won his first Grand Slam title, is a "possible, albeit obvious place" for him to announce his retirement from tennis.

The 37-year-old, while talking about his retirement plans, said that he does not have a "fairytale ending" to his career in mind but he also does not want to leave the court with an injury.

"Wimbledon stands out as maybe a place. I don't have the fairytale ending in my head saying there has to be another title somewhere. I hope it doesn't end with an injury," Federer told CNN in an interview.

"I'd like to go out on my terms." So, no date, but at least we have a possible, albeit obvious place," he added.

When asked about his childhood coach Peter Carter, who died a year before Federer lifted his first Grand Slam title at Wimbledon, the 20 times Grand Slam title winner said that he misses his coach a lot and is thankful to him for strengthening his playing technique.

"Peter was really a really important person in my life -- it's because of him I can say thank you for my technique today. I still miss him so much. I hope he would be proud," Federer said.

"I guess he didn't want me to be a wasted talent. So I guess it was somewhat of a wake-up call from me when he passed away. I really started to train hard," an emotional Federer added.

The tennis ace asserted that he has been lucky enough to get the support of the right people at right time. "I think what I would like to say is that I've been incredibly fortunate to have had the right people at the right time, the right coaches at the right time. Sure, you could argue I made those decisions, but I also got lucky along the way," he said.

Federer will be seen competing in the 2019 Australian Open where he is going to participate as a defending champion. The event is slated to held from January 14 to 27 in Melbourne, Australia.