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Queen dismayed at UK politicians' inability to govern: Report

Queen Elizabeth II is reportedly "dismayed" at the inability of Britain's political class to govern properly, according to a UK media report.

The 93-year-old monarch, who traditionally stays publicly neutral on political matters, is believed to have made the comments at a private event shortly after David Cameron's resignation as British Prime Minister following the Brexit referendum in June 2016.

A royal source described by 'The Sunday Times' as "impeccable" told the newspaper that the Queen's frustration has only grown since then.

"I think she's really dismayed. I've heard her talking about her disappointment in the current political class and its inability to govern correctly," the source is quoted as saying.

"She expressed her exasperation and frustration about the quality of our political leadership, and that frustration will only have grown," said the senior royal source, who claims to have witnessed the Queen's rare conversation on politics.

The revelation comes as there is growing media speculation amid Buckingham Palace and Downing Street holding discussions about how to keep the monarch out of any looming constitutional crisis over Brexit and Prime Minister Boris Johnson's pledge to leave the European Union (EU) by the October 31 deadline, with or without a deal.

There are fears that politicians will try to force the Queen to get involved if Johnson loses a no-confidence vote early next month and refuses to step aside.

It is feared he would instead call a General Election after a forced no-deal Brexit, leaving MPs with no recourse of preventing the EU crash-out without any agreement in place.

UK shadow chancellor John McDonnell has threatened to send Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn to Buckingham Palace "in a cab" to tell the Queen that the Opposition party is "taking over" if Johnson were to refuse to resign after losing such a no-confidence vote.

Under the UK's Fixed-term Parliaments Act, the Queen could be required to ask Corbyn or another senior politician to form a government that can command the confidence of the House of Commons.

Buckingham Palace has declined to formally comment on what is feared to further mount into a constitutional quandary in the coming weeks.