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GiveIndia raises Rs. 75 lakh for care of abandoned babies during COVID crisis

September 22, 2020 23:30 IST
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GiveIndia

Bengaluru (Karnataka) [India], September 22 (ANI/NewsVoir): GiveIndia, a Bengaluru-based nonprofit organisation, has raised over Rs 75 lakh from more than 2,515 donors across the country for the welfare of abandoned babies at an adoption centre in Ahmednagar, Maharashtra.

In the past few months, as the COVID-19 crisis has unfolded, the issue of abandoned children in India - of which there are 29.6 million, according to a UNICEF report - has been exacerbated. During this time most maternity facilities have also been closed and women and girls are being forced to deliver their babies at home where they are unable to access essential pre and postnatal services.

With more girls and women giving birth behind the closed doors during lockdown, GiveIndia's NGO partner Snehalaya has reported a 20 per cent increase in the number of newborns to have come to their child adoption centre, Snehankur, in the last few months.

Another fallout of the pandemic is that adoptions are on hold. While Snehalaya's dedicated team has been providing shelter, medical and nutritional support to the babies at their centre, with the increased number in their care and unable to employ additional staff, their already limited resources are overstretched. They need Rs 20,000 per baby per month for end to end care - from rescue to adoption. The GiveIndia fundraiser has now met their immediate requirements.

Along with these infants, Snehalaya also looks after the welfare of abandoned pregnant girls and women who need medical and nutritional care. Currently 40 such women, including minor pregnant girls and rape survivors, are in their care.

GiveIndia exists to alleviate poverty by enabling the world to give. Established in 2000, we are India's most trusted giving platform. Our suite of products & solutions enable all givers - individuals and organisations - to donate conveniently to any cause directly on our platform, at their workplace or through one of our partners. Our community of 1.5M plus donors and 150 plus partners have supported 1,500 plus verified nonprofits, impacting 8M plus lives across India.

This story is provided by NewsVoir. ANI will not be responsible in any way for the content of this article. (ANI/NewsVoir)

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(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

 

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GiveIndia raises Rs. 75 lakh for care of abandoned babies during COVID crisis

Bengaluru (Karnataka) [India], September 22 (ANI/NewsVoir): GiveIndia, a Bengaluru-based nonprofit organisation, has raised over Rs 75 lakh from more than 2,515 donors across the country for the welfare of abandoned babies at an adoption centre in Ahmednagar, Maharashtra.

In the past few months, as the COVID-19 crisis has unfolded, the issue of abandoned children in India - of which there are 29.6 million, according to a UNICEF report - has been exacerbated. During this time most maternity facilities have also been closed and women and girls are being forced to deliver their babies at home where they are unable to access essential pre and postnatal services.

With more girls and women giving birth behind the closed doors during lockdown, GiveIndia's NGO partner Snehalaya has reported a 20 per cent increase in the number of newborns to have come to their child adoption centre, Snehankur, in the last few months.

Another fallout of the pandemic is that adoptions are on hold. While Snehalaya's dedicated team has been providing shelter, medical and nutritional support to the babies at their centre, with the increased number in their care and unable to employ additional staff, their already limited resources are overstretched. They need Rs 20,000 per baby per month for end to end care - from rescue to adoption. The GiveIndia fundraiser has now met their immediate requirements.

Along with these infants, Snehalaya also looks after the welfare of abandoned pregnant girls and women who need medical and nutritional care. Currently 40 such women, including minor pregnant girls and rape survivors, are in their care.

GiveIndia exists to alleviate poverty by enabling the world to give. Established in 2000, we are India's most trusted giving platform. Our suite of products & solutions enable all givers - individuals and organisations - to donate conveniently to any cause directly on our platform, at their workplace or through one of our partners. Our community of 1.5M plus donors and 150 plus partners have supported 1,500 plus verified nonprofits, impacting 8M plus lives across India.

This story is provided by NewsVoir. ANI will not be responsible in any way for the content of this article. (ANI/NewsVoir)

DISCLAIMER


(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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