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August 13: The lensman`s view

  • August 13: The lensman`s view

    August 13: The lensman`s view

  • <p>
<b>A customer holds a BlackBerry handset inside a mobile selling shop in Kolkata</b> 
</p><p>
Research In Motion is optimistic that it will be able to resolve the Indian government&#39;s security concerns, a senior company official said on Friday.
</p><p>
"I am optimistic," Robert Crow, a vice president at the Canadian maker of popular BlackBerry phones, said when asked whether the company will reach an agreement with the Indian government.
</p><p>
"It is a step in a long journey," he told reporters.
</p><p>
India has given RIM until Aug. 31 to comply with a request to gain access to encrypted corporate email and messaging services or those services will be shut. 
</p><p>

    A customer holds a BlackBerry handset inside a mobile selling shop in Kolkata

    Research In Motion is optimistic that it will be able to resolve the Indian government's security concerns, a senior company official said on Friday.

    "I am optimistic," Robert Crow, a vice president at the Canadian maker of popular BlackBerry phones, said when asked whether the company will reach an agreement with the Indian government.

    "It is a step in a long journey," he told reporters.

    India has given RIM until Aug. 31 to comply with a request to gain access to encrypted corporate email and messaging services or those services will be shut.

  • <p>
<b>A salesman displays gold ornaments at a jewellery showroom in Chandigarh</b>
</p><p>India&#39;s wholesale gold demand remained subdued on Friday afternoon as prices hit a four-week global high, though a strong rupee support prices at home, dealers said.
</p><p>"Sales are below normal now but some jewellery exporters are there buying in the market," said a dealer with a state-run bank, which deals in bullion.
</p><p>Gold touched a four-week high, extending gains from the previous day as investors bought the precious metal and shied away from riskier assets on concern about the health of the global economy.
</p><p>
International gold was trading at $1,215.70/1,216.60 an ounce at 1:05 p.m., as against the previous close of $1,211.20/1,215.20 an ounce, after hitting a four-week high of $1,217.35, the loftiest level since July 15.
</p>

    A salesman displays gold ornaments at a jewellery showroom in Chandigarh

    India's wholesale gold demand remained subdued on Friday afternoon as prices hit a four-week global high, though a strong rupee support prices at home, dealers said.

    "Sales are below normal now but some jewellery exporters are there buying in the market," said a dealer with a state-run bank, which deals in bullion.

    Gold touched a four-week high, extending gains from the previous day as investors bought the precious metal and shied away from riskier assets on concern about the health of the global economy.

    International gold was trading at $1,215.70/1,216.60 an ounce at 1:05 p.m., as against the previous close of $1,211.20/1,215.20 an ounce, after hitting a four-week high of $1,217.35, the loftiest level since July 15.

  • <p><b>Chairman of Tata Group Ratan Tata attends the annual general meeting of The Indian Hotels Company Ltd in Mumbai</b>
</p><p>
When it comes to Indian businesses, The Tata Group is the oldest and best-known: the conglomerate owns the luxury Jaguar car brand, it&#39;s made the world&#39;s cheapest car, and its chairman, 72-year-old Ratan Tata, oversees an empire that ranges from salt to software.
</p><p>
This month, Tata Group set another milestone: it became the first Indian family-run business to look beyond the family for a successor to Tata, who is due to retire by end-2012.
</p><p>
Tata has no apparent successor, leaving the business founded by his great-grandfather potentially vulnerable.
</p><p>
But his decision to look within the company, as well as abroad, will go some way in dispelling some of the negative notions of family firms in India, highlighted by the bitter five-year feud between the billionaire Ambani brothers.
</p>

    Chairman of Tata Group Ratan Tata attends the annual general meeting of The Indian Hotels Company Ltd in Mumbai

    When it comes to Indian businesses, The Tata Group is the oldest and best-known: the conglomerate owns the luxury Jaguar car brand, it's made the world's cheapest car, and its chairman, 72-year-old Ratan Tata, oversees an empire that ranges from salt to software.

    This month, Tata Group set another milestone: it became the first Indian family-run business to look beyond the family for a successor to Tata, who is due to retire by end-2012.

    Tata has no apparent successor, leaving the business founded by his great-grandfather potentially vulnerable.

    But his decision to look within the company, as well as abroad, will go some way in dispelling some of the negative notions of family firms in India, highlighted by the bitter five-year feud between the billionaire Ambani brothers.

  • <p>
<b>A construction worker walks past a logo next to the main entrance of the Google building in Zurich</b>
</p><p>
India will go after any company, including Google, after cracking down on BlackBerry in its quest to keep the world&#39;s fastest growing mobile phone market safe from militants and cyber spying, a government source said on Friday.
</p><p>
India has given Research In Motion, the maker of the popular BlackBerry smartphone, until Aug. 31 to comply with a request to gain access to encrypted corporate email and messaging services or those services will be shut.
</p><p>
"Wherever there is a concern on grounds of national security the government will want access and every country has a right to lawful interference," a senior interior security official, who declined to be identified, told Reuters.
</p><p>
Canadian-based Research In Motion (RIM) is under pressure from governments around the world to give access to its codes. Other companies have also faced scrutiny sin

    A construction worker walks past a logo next to the main entrance of the Google building in Zurich

    India will go after any company, including Google, after cracking down on BlackBerry in its quest to keep the world's fastest growing mobile phone market safe from militants and cyber spying, a government source said on Friday.

    India has given Research In Motion, the maker of the popular BlackBerry smartphone, until Aug. 31 to comply with a request to gain access to encrypted corporate email and messaging services or those services will be shut.

    "Wherever there is a concern on grounds of national security the government will want access and every country has a right to lawful interference," a senior interior security official, who declined to be identified, told Reuters.

    Canadian-based Research In Motion (RIM) is under pressure from governments around the world to give access to its codes. Other companies have also faced scrutiny sin

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