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August 27: News captured today

  • August 27: News captured today

    August 27: News captured today

  • <p><B>A man uses an electronic machine to check a currency note at a money exchange shop in Siliguri</B>
</p><p>
The rupee moved in a tight range on Friday afternoon with mild losses in shares and the dollar overseas providing little direction ahead of the Federal Reserve chairman&#39;s speech on the US economy.
</p><p>
* Ben Bernanke is scheduled to speak at an annual meeting of the world&#39;s central bankers in the US state of Wyoming at 1400 GMT, with market players looking for any clues on his plan to boost measures to support the economy.
</p><p>
* At 2 pm, the partially convertible rupee was at 46.86/87 per dollar, marginally below 46.84/85 at close on Thursday. It has moved in range of 46.8150 to 46.89 so far.
</p><p>
* The dollar rose against the yen on Friday, trimming earlier losses due to wariness on possible measures from Japanese authorities to stem the yen&#39;s rise.
</p><p>
* The index of the dollar against six majors was marginally lower. Dealers expect the

    A man uses an electronic machine to check a currency note at a money exchange shop in Siliguri

    The rupee moved in a tight range on Friday afternoon with mild losses in shares and the dollar overseas providing little direction ahead of the Federal Reserve chairman's speech on the US economy.

    * Ben Bernanke is scheduled to speak at an annual meeting of the world's central bankers in the US state of Wyoming at 1400 GMT, with market players looking for any clues on his plan to boost measures to support the economy.

    * At 2 pm, the partially convertible rupee was at 46.86/87 per dollar, marginally below 46.84/85 at close on Thursday. It has moved in range of 46.8150 to 46.89 so far.

    * The dollar rose against the yen on Friday, trimming earlier losses due to wariness on possible measures from Japanese authorities to stem the yen's rise.

    * The index of the dollar against six majors was marginally lower. Dealers expect the

  • <p><B>A customer holds a BlackBerry handset at a mobile phone shop in Ahmedabad</B>
</p><p>
India insisted on Friday it would block some BlackBerry services next week if the smartphone maker did not address security concerns, and government officials said they were hopeful for a solution soon.
</p><p>
Time is running out for RIM to give India the means to track and read its secure email and instant messaging services that officials fear could be misused by militants and to create political instability.
</p><p>
Executives of the Canadian firm will meet Indian government officials for a second day on Friday in last-ditch negotiations aimed at finding a solution ahead of an Aug 31 deadline. The government has said it will take a final decision on Monday.
</p><p>
We will only accept a solution which will enable us lawful interception of BlackBerry services in the interest of national security, a government official close to the talks told Reuters.
</p><p>
The solution, if they co

    A customer holds a BlackBerry handset at a mobile phone shop in Ahmedabad

    India insisted on Friday it would block some BlackBerry services next week if the smartphone maker did not address security concerns, and government officials said they were hopeful for a solution soon.

    Time is running out for RIM to give India the means to track and read its secure email and instant messaging services that officials fear could be misused by militants and to create political instability.

    Executives of the Canadian firm will meet Indian government officials for a second day on Friday in last-ditch negotiations aimed at finding a solution ahead of an Aug 31 deadline. The government has said it will take a final decision on Monday.

    We will only accept a solution which will enable us lawful interception of BlackBerry services in the interest of national security, a government official close to the talks told Reuters.

    The solution, if they co

  • <p><B>Labourers work inside a steel factory on the outskirts of Agartala</B>
</p><p>
India&#39;s economy probably grew an annual 8.7 per cent in the June quarter, its strongest pace since the December quarter of 2007, the median forecast of 21 economists showed. Forecasts ranged between 7.7 and 9.4 per cent.
</p><p>
The economy, which had expanded an annual 8.6 per cent in the March quarter, has been riding on robust manufacturing activity and the outlook for farm output has brightened following good monsoon rains.
</p><p>
Factors to watch:
</p><p>
* Manufacturing production rose an annual 12.2 per cent in the quarter through June, compared with a growth of 3.4 per cent in the same quarter last year.
</p><p>
* Monsoon rains, which are vital for boosting farm production and rural incomes in the nation of more than 1.2 billion people, have been near normal in the four-month annual season that began in June.
</p>

    Labourers work inside a steel factory on the outskirts of Agartala

    India's economy probably grew an annual 8.7 per cent in the June quarter, its strongest pace since the December quarter of 2007, the median forecast of 21 economists showed. Forecasts ranged between 7.7 and 9.4 per cent.

    The economy, which had expanded an annual 8.6 per cent in the March quarter, has been riding on robust manufacturing activity and the outlook for farm output has brightened following good monsoon rains.

    Factors to watch:

    * Manufacturing production rose an annual 12.2 per cent in the quarter through June, compared with a growth of 3.4 per cent in the same quarter last year.

    * Monsoon rains, which are vital for boosting farm production and rural incomes in the nation of more than 1.2 billion people, have been near normal in the four-month annual season that began in June.

  • <p><B>A woman buyer looks at gold bangles at a jewellery shop in Mumbai</B>
</p><p>
India, the world&#39;s largest market for gold, is seen importing 504.5 tonnes of gold in 2010, according to a Reuters poll.
</p><p>
In 2009, India&#39;s import of gold was at 480 tonnes, the worst in more than a decade, data from the World Gold Council shows.
</p><p>
At a conference in Varca in Goa state in west India, gold industry members gathered to gauge India&#39;s rebound in demand this year and the outlook for prices.
</p><p>
India&#39;s gold imports in 2010 on an average is 504.5 metric tonnes
</p>

    A woman buyer looks at gold bangles at a jewellery shop in Mumbai

    India, the world's largest market for gold, is seen importing 504.5 tonnes of gold in 2010, according to a Reuters poll.

    In 2009, India's import of gold was at 480 tonnes, the worst in more than a decade, data from the World Gold Council shows.

    At a conference in Varca in Goa state in west India, gold industry members gathered to gauge India's rebound in demand this year and the outlook for prices.

    India's gold imports in 2010 on an average is 504.5 metric tonnes

  • <p><b>The engine and body of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner is seen at the Farnborough International Airshow 2010 in Farnborough, southern England</b>
</p><p>
Boeing has pushed back delivery of its first 787 Dreamliner by several weeks due to a delay in the availability of a Rolls-Royce engine which is needed for the final phases of flight testing.
</p><p>
The US planemaker now expects to deliver the carbon-composite plane, already delayed by more than two years, to launch customer Japan&#39;s All Nippon Airways (ANA) by the middle of the first quarter of 2011.
</p><p>
Boeing previously said the first delivery would be made a few weeks into 2011.
</p><p>
The delay comes after a Rolls&#39; Trent 1000 engine blew up earlier this month at a test site in Derby, central England, forcing the company to temporarily close the facility.
</p><p>
The delivery date revision follows an assessment of the availability of an engine needed for the final phases of flight test this fall, Boeing said

    The engine and body of the Boeing 787 Dreamliner is seen at the Farnborough International Airshow 2010 in Farnborough, southern England

    Boeing has pushed back delivery of its first 787 Dreamliner by several weeks due to a delay in the availability of a Rolls-Royce engine which is needed for the final phases of flight testing.

    The US planemaker now expects to deliver the carbon-composite plane, already delayed by more than two years, to launch customer Japan's All Nippon Airways (ANA) by the middle of the first quarter of 2011.

    Boeing previously said the first delivery would be made a few weeks into 2011.

    The delay comes after a Rolls' Trent 1000 engine blew up earlier this month at a test site in Derby, central England, forcing the company to temporarily close the facility.

    The delivery date revision follows an assessment of the availability of an engine needed for the final phases of flight test this fall, Boeing said

  • <p><b>Protesters carry placards outside an Apple premier reseller store during a demonstration in Hong Kong</b>
</p><p>
A master storyteller and self-confessed Apple fan hardly makes for a compelling advocate for social change. But Mike Daisey, whose new monologue focuses on what he calls the dark side of Apple&#39;s iconic gadgets, hopes he can pressure Chief Executive Steve Jobs to push for better labour conditions at factories in China, where most Apple gadgets are assembled.
</p><p>
The two-hour monologue entitled \"The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs\" is part paean and part critique of Apple Inc, and Jobs, a pancreatic cancer survivor and founder of the iconic company that wields enormous clout in the tech world.
</p><p>
Dressed in black -- in a nod to Jobs&#39; trademark black turtleneck and jeans -- the stocky Daisey sat in the spotlight at a desk on an otherwise bare stage in Mumbai this week, gesticulating through his expletive-ridden monologue, barely pausing to si

    Protesters carry placards outside an Apple premier reseller store during a demonstration in Hong Kong

    A master storyteller and self-confessed Apple fan hardly makes for a compelling advocate for social change. But Mike Daisey, whose new monologue focuses on what he calls the dark side of Apple's iconic gadgets, hopes he can pressure Chief Executive Steve Jobs to push for better labour conditions at factories in China, where most Apple gadgets are assembled.

    The two-hour monologue entitled \"The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs\" is part paean and part critique of Apple Inc, and Jobs, a pancreatic cancer survivor and founder of the iconic company that wields enormous clout in the tech world.

    Dressed in black -- in a nod to Jobs' trademark black turtleneck and jeans -- the stocky Daisey sat in the spotlight at a desk on an otherwise bare stage in Mumbai this week, gesticulating through his expletive-ridden monologue, barely pausing to si

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