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February 17: Snapshots for the day

  • February 17: Snapshots for the day

    February 17: Snapshots for the day

  • <p><b>A Blackberry smartphone is displayed in this August 12, 2010 illustrative photo taken in Hong Kong.</b>
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India&#39;s government is in talks with cellular carriers over access to BlackBerry&#39;s encrypted email services after the Canadian company failed to meet a deadline to make the service available to security agencies.
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Canadian smartphone maker Research in Motion (RIM) failed to fulfill Indian demands to monitor encrypted corporate email by a Jan. 31 deadline. RIM had previously said it was confident India would not ban its services.
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Last month, RIM said it had given India the means to access its Messenger service ahead of the deadline but had reiterated that it could not give the authorities access to monitor secure corporate emails.
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\"We don&#39;t have anything to do with BlackBerry. We are only dealing with (mobile phone) service providers,\" Home Secretary G.K. Pillai told Reuters on Thursday.
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    A Blackberry smartphone is displayed in this August 12, 2010 illustrative photo taken in Hong Kong.

    India's government is in talks with cellular carriers over access to BlackBerry's encrypted email services after the Canadian company failed to meet a deadline to make the service available to security agencies.

    Canadian smartphone maker Research in Motion (RIM) failed to fulfill Indian demands to monitor encrypted corporate email by a Jan. 31 deadline. RIM had previously said it was confident India would not ban its services.

    Last month, RIM said it had given India the means to access its Messenger service ahead of the deadline but had reiterated that it could not give the authorities access to monitor secure corporate emails.

    \"We don't have anything to do with BlackBerry. We are only dealing with (mobile phone) service providers,\" Home Secretary G.K. Pillai told Reuters on Thursday.

  • <p><b>Labourers unload coal from a truck at a roadside coal store on a highway on the outskirts of Kolkata in this December 4, 2009 file photo.</p>
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GVK Power and Infrastructure is in advanced talks to buy a coal mine owned by Australia&#39;s Hancock Prospecting, three sources with direct knowledge told Reuters on Thursday.
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The company has offered about $2.25 billion for Kevin Corner, said the sources, who declined to be named as they were not authorised to speak to the media.
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GVK Power and Infrastructure, which focuses on energy and transportation projects, has hired Ernst & Young as a transaction advisor to the deal, one of the sources said.
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    Labourers unload coal from a truck at a roadside coal store on a highway on the outskirts of Kolkata in this December 4, 2009 file photo.

    GVK Power and Infrastructure is in advanced talks to buy a coal mine owned by Australia's Hancock Prospecting, three sources with direct knowledge told Reuters on Thursday.

    The company has offered about $2.25 billion for Kevin Corner, said the sources, who declined to be named as they were not authorised to speak to the media.

    GVK Power and Infrastructure, which focuses on energy and transportation projects, has hired Ernst & Young as a transaction advisor to the deal, one of the sources said.

  • <b><p>The sun rises behind a communications tower in New Delhi</p>
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The government was forced on Thursday to scrap a contract approved by the prime minister&#39;s office to lease valuable satellite spectrum in another blow to his credibility, stung by a series of corruption scandals.
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The about-face followed a probe into how the state-run Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) granted a small firm, Devas Multimedia, a contract to obtain airwaves through two state satellites in 2005 without a proper bidding process.
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Failure to seek the highest bid for access to the spectrum, which can be used for wireless broadband and other data services, may have cost the state billions of dollars in lost revenue, according to reports, which have said the lease was worth about $220 million.
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The opposition has complained that the chaotic and unprofessional way the government issued licences in the world&#39;s fastest growing mobile phone market, with more than 7

    The sun rises behind a communications tower in New Delhi

    The government was forced on Thursday to scrap a contract approved by the prime minister's office to lease valuable satellite spectrum in another blow to his credibility, stung by a series of corruption scandals.

    The about-face followed a probe into how the state-run Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) granted a small firm, Devas Multimedia, a contract to obtain airwaves through two state satellites in 2005 without a proper bidding process.

    Failure to seek the highest bid for access to the spectrum, which can be used for wireless broadband and other data services, may have cost the state billions of dollars in lost revenue, according to reports, which have said the lease was worth about $220 million.

    The opposition has complained that the chaotic and unprofessional way the government issued licences in the world's fastest growing mobile phone market, with more than 7

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