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November 23: Picturesque newsview

  • November 23: Picturesque newsview

    November 23: Picturesque newsview

  • <p><b>People look at an electronic board at a brokerage house in Shanghai</b>
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The dollar and US Treasuries rose and US stock futures fell on Tuesday after a major exchange of artillery fire on the Korean peninsula.
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The euro, stocks and commodities also fell as a bailout for Ireland failed to allay fears of a wider crisis.
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North Korean artillery fired dozens of shells onto a South Korean island near their disputed sea border, wounding several people, setting fire to buildings and prompting a return of fire by the South, Seoul&#39;s military and media reported.
</p><p>
Seoul&#39;s financial markets had already closed but international markets reacted, with the dollar up 0.4 per cent on the day against a basket of currency. The dollar index rose from 78.77 before the reports to a session high of 79.07.
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US 10-year Treasury futures, a traditional safe haven, were up 0.4 per cent on the day and US S&P 500 stock index futures were down 0.9 per cent .

    People look at an electronic board at a brokerage house in Shanghai

    The dollar and US Treasuries rose and US stock futures fell on Tuesday after a major exchange of artillery fire on the Korean peninsula.

    The euro, stocks and commodities also fell as a bailout for Ireland failed to allay fears of a wider crisis.

    North Korean artillery fired dozens of shells onto a South Korean island near their disputed sea border, wounding several people, setting fire to buildings and prompting a return of fire by the South, Seoul's military and media reported.

    Seoul's financial markets had already closed but international markets reacted, with the dollar up 0.4 per cent on the day against a basket of currency. The dollar index rose from 78.77 before the reports to a session high of 79.07.

    US 10-year Treasury futures, a traditional safe haven, were up 0.4 per cent on the day and US S&P 500 stock index futures were down 0.9 per cent .

  • <p><b>A new SsangYong Actyon (R) is seen at the Moscow Auto Salon 2010 (the Moscow International Motor Show)</b>
</p><p>
India&#39;s Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd signed a deal to buy South Korea&#39;s money-losing Ssangyong Motor Co Ltd for 522.5 billion won ($464 million), Ssangyong Motor said on Tuesday.
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Ssangyong shares jumped 6 per cent in a broader market down 0.27 per cent as of 0208 GMT (0738 IST).
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    A new SsangYong Actyon (R) is seen at the Moscow Auto Salon 2010 (the Moscow International Motor Show)

    India's Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd signed a deal to buy South Korea's money-losing Ssangyong Motor Co Ltd for 522.5 billion won ($464 million), Ssangyong Motor said on Tuesday.

    Ssangyong shares jumped 6 per cent in a broader market down 0.27 per cent as of 0208 GMT (0738 IST).

  • <p><b>Wind turbines turn in the breeze at Nagaj village in Sangli district in Maharashtra</b>
</p><p>
India&#39;s power sector may see a rise in foreign inflows as government reforms bear fruit and domestic players look overseas to bolster borrowing in a sector key to sustaining the Asian giant&#39;s rapid economic growth.
</p><p>
Government officials and analysts agree the bulk of the money to build India&#39;s coal, wind and hydroelectric plants will be local, but the power sector&#39;s share of total foreign inflows is likely to rise from the relative disappointments of recent years.
</p><p>
The power sector&#39;s share has risen to 7.6 per cent of total foreign direct investment this year from around 5 per cent last year and 2-3 per cent earlier, said infrastructure specialist Kameswara Rao at PricewaterhouseCoopers. The sector&#39;s share of total private equity grew to 13 per cent last year.
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    Wind turbines turn in the breeze at Nagaj village in Sangli district in Maharashtra

    India's power sector may see a rise in foreign inflows as government reforms bear fruit and domestic players look overseas to bolster borrowing in a sector key to sustaining the Asian giant's rapid economic growth.

    Government officials and analysts agree the bulk of the money to build India's coal, wind and hydroelectric plants will be local, but the power sector's share of total foreign inflows is likely to rise from the relative disappointments of recent years.

    The power sector's share has risen to 7.6 per cent of total foreign direct investment this year from around 5 per cent last year and 2-3 per cent earlier, said infrastructure specialist Kameswara Rao at PricewaterhouseCoopers. The sector's share of total private equity grew to 13 per cent last year.

  • <p><b>Two men speak on telephones at a roadside telephone booth in New Delhi</b>
</p><p>
Prime minister will face questions in the Supreme Court on Tuesday over his handling of an alleged telecoms scam as parliament remains paralysed over demands by the opposition for a full probe.
</p><p>
The court has asked Manmohan Singh to explain why he took 16 months to examine a request for his now-sacked telecoms minister to face prosecution over alleged corruption. Singh decided in the end not to approve the request from a senior opposition lawmaker.
</p><p>
The court began hearing the arguments of Singh&#39;s representative at 10 am.
</p><p>
Any significant criticism by the judges could make it hard for the prime minister, long seen as one of India&#39;s most honest leaders, to remain in office.
</p><p>
The scandal has now engulfed parliament as opposition parties have kept it shut since Nov. 9 over demands for a full parliamentary investigation into the disputes over sale of teleco

    Two men speak on telephones at a roadside telephone booth in New Delhi

    Prime minister will face questions in the Supreme Court on Tuesday over his handling of an alleged telecoms scam as parliament remains paralysed over demands by the opposition for a full probe.

    The court has asked Manmohan Singh to explain why he took 16 months to examine a request for his now-sacked telecoms minister to face prosecution over alleged corruption. Singh decided in the end not to approve the request from a senior opposition lawmaker.

    The court began hearing the arguments of Singh's representative at 10 am.

    Any significant criticism by the judges could make it hard for the prime minister, long seen as one of India's most honest leaders, to remain in office.

    The scandal has now engulfed parliament as opposition parties have kept it shut since Nov. 9 over demands for a full parliamentary investigation into the disputes over sale of teleco

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