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Merck to set up Euro 30-mn OLED production plant in Germany

Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) has the potential to become the technology of the future for displays and lighting

BS B2B Bureau  |  Darmstadt, Germany 

Merck has begun work on a new production plant in Darmstadt (Germany) for high-purity organic light-emitting diode (OLED) materials, which are used in state-of-the-art displays and lighting systems. With an investment of about Euro 30 million in the new plant, which is expected to start production in July 2016, Merck is strengthening its position in the OLED business. Merck aims to be a leading supplier of OLED materials by 2018. The company wishes to make use of its experience in the liquid crystals business, where it is the global leader.
 
Organic light-emitting diodes are semiconducting organic materials which emit light and luminesce when electric voltage is applied. They are particularly suited for applications in the very latest generation of displays and lighting because they provide brilliant colours and sharp images from any viewing angle. In addition, they have a long lifespan and are highly energy-efficient.
 
“The new OLED production plant is one of the largest single investments that Merck has made at the Darmstadt site in recent years. It reflects the absolute highest technical standards. OLED technology has the potential to become the technology of the future for displays and lighting. We invested significant sums in this technology at an early stage. The new production plant is thus another important link in this chain,” said Bernd Reckmann, member of the executive board of Merck.
 
Merck is cooperating with the Japanese printing technology specialist Seiko Epson on printable displays for OLED screens. These materials stand out due to their tremendous innovative potential in smartphone, tablets and televisions. Flexible or rollable screens are also possible for private consumers in the form of ultra-thin, energy-saving displays for portable devices or large video walls that are produced with OLEDs using thin-film technology. The automotive industry as well as the fields of medicine and education are also opening up new possibilities for the materials.

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First Published: Mon, June 22 2015. 14:45 IST
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Merck to set up Euro 30-mn OLED production plant in Germany

Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) has the potential to become the technology of the future for displays and lighting

Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) has the potential to become the technology of the future for displays and lighting Merck has begun work on a new production plant in Darmstadt (Germany) for high-purity organic light-emitting diode (OLED) materials, which are used in state-of-the-art displays and lighting systems. With an investment of about Euro 30 million in the new plant, which is expected to start production in July 2016, Merck is strengthening its position in the OLED business. Merck aims to be a leading supplier of OLED materials by 2018. The company wishes to make use of its experience in the liquid crystals business, where it is the global leader.
 
Organic light-emitting diodes are semiconducting organic materials which emit light and luminesce when electric voltage is applied. They are particularly suited for applications in the very latest generation of displays and lighting because they provide brilliant colours and sharp images from any viewing angle. In addition, they have a long lifespan and are highly energy-efficient.
 
“The new OLED production plant is one of the largest single investments that Merck has made at the Darmstadt site in recent years. It reflects the absolute highest technical standards. OLED technology has the potential to become the technology of the future for displays and lighting. We invested significant sums in this technology at an early stage. The new production plant is thus another important link in this chain,” said Bernd Reckmann, member of the executive board of Merck.
 
Merck is cooperating with the Japanese printing technology specialist Seiko Epson on printable displays for OLED screens. These materials stand out due to their tremendous innovative potential in smartphone, tablets and televisions. Flexible or rollable screens are also possible for private consumers in the form of ultra-thin, energy-saving displays for portable devices or large video walls that are produced with OLEDs using thin-film technology. The automotive industry as well as the fields of medicine and education are also opening up new possibilities for the materials.
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Merck to set up Euro 30-mn OLED production plant in Germany

Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) has the potential to become the technology of the future for displays and lighting

Merck has begun work on a new production plant in Darmstadt (Germany) for high-purity organic light-emitting diode (OLED) materials, which are used in state-of-the-art displays and lighting systems. With an investment of about Euro 30 million in the new plant, which is expected to start production in July 2016, Merck is strengthening its position in the OLED business. Merck aims to be a leading supplier of OLED materials by 2018. The company wishes to make use of its experience in the liquid crystals business, where it is the global leader.
 
Organic light-emitting diodes are semiconducting organic materials which emit light and luminesce when electric voltage is applied. They are particularly suited for applications in the very latest generation of displays and lighting because they provide brilliant colours and sharp images from any viewing angle. In addition, they have a long lifespan and are highly energy-efficient.
 
“The new OLED production plant is one of the largest single investments that Merck has made at the Darmstadt site in recent years. It reflects the absolute highest technical standards. OLED technology has the potential to become the technology of the future for displays and lighting. We invested significant sums in this technology at an early stage. The new production plant is thus another important link in this chain,” said Bernd Reckmann, member of the executive board of Merck.
 
Merck is cooperating with the Japanese printing technology specialist Seiko Epson on printable displays for OLED screens. These materials stand out due to their tremendous innovative potential in smartphone, tablets and televisions. Flexible or rollable screens are also possible for private consumers in the form of ultra-thin, energy-saving displays for portable devices or large video walls that are produced with OLEDs using thin-film technology. The automotive industry as well as the fields of medicine and education are also opening up new possibilities for the materials.

image
Business Standard
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