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Sri Lanka extends credit line with India by $200 mn for fuel: Power Min

Colombo was also in talks with New Delhi over extending the credit line by an additional $500 million, minister Kanchana Wijesekera told a news conference.

Topics
sri lanka | Fuel | Credit

Reuters 

Sri Lanka needs between $3 billion to $4 billion this year to pull itself out of an unprecedented economic crisis, Finance Minister Ali Sabry said
Sri Lanka will also need dollars to pay for crude oil shipments to supplement imports from India

has extended a line with India by $200 million in order to procure emergency stocks, the country's power and energy minister said on Monday, with four shipments due to arrive in May.

Colombo was also in talks with New Delhi over extending the line by an additional $500 million, minister Kanchana Wijesekera told a news conference.

Hit hard by the pandemic and short of revenue after Gotabaya Rajapaksa's government imposed steep tax cuts, the island nation is now also critically short of foreign exchange and has approached the International Monetary Fund for an emergency bailout.

Rampant inflation and shortages of imported food, and medicines has led to weeks of sporadically violent protests.

has used $400 million, on multiple shipments in April, of the $500 million line extended by India earlier this year, Wijesekera said. Two shipments will be paid for from the remaining funds in May.

"The Indian credit line was extended by $200 million recently and this will be utilised for four shipments in May.

Talks are continuing for a further $500 million with India so in total the credit line will be $1.2 billion," Wijesekera said.

However, is still facing payment challenges for fuel imports with the state-run Ceylon Petroleum Corporation (CPC) owing $235 million for shipments already received, while about $500 million more will be needed to pay for letters of credit maturing over the next six weeks, he added.

Sri Lanka will also need dollars to pay for crude oil shipments to supplement imports from India.

"We have made procurement plans till June but we still need to resolve how to find sufficient amounts of foreign exchange to make payments," Wijesekera said.

(Reporting by Uditha Jayansinghe; Writing by Alasdair Pal; Editing by Catherine Evans and Hugh Lawson)

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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First Published: Mon, May 02 2022. 16:05 IST
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