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China's financial regulators draft tougher rules for too-big-to-fail banks

Chinese authorities have started to evaluate systemically important banks this year by measuring assets of the nation's 30 largest lenders.

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China | Banking sector | Chinese debt

Bloomberg 

New foreign investment is on track to set another record in 2020, hitting 94% of last year’s total by the end of November
G-SIBs in emerging markets must have liabilities and instruments available to “bail in” the equivalent to at least 16 per cent of risk-weighted assets by Jan. 1, 2025

China’s financial regulators plan to impose additional capital requirements on the nation’s systemically important banks, seeking to curb risks and safeguard stability of the $49 trillion industry.

Banks considered too big to fail will be put into five categories and face a surcharge of between 0.25 per cent and 1.5 per cent on top of the mandatory capital adequacy ratios, the People’s Bank of and the Banking and Insurance Regulatory Commission said in a draft rule on Friday.

Lenders will also need to make detailed plans on how to recover from a crisis, as well as draft living wills with disposal plans in case they can’t operate as an ongoing entity.

Chinese authorities have started to evaluate systemically important banks this year by measuring assets of the nation’s 30 largest lenders. The firms will also be scored by their interconnectedness with other financial institutions, and the complexity of businesses such as derivatives and wealth management operations.

While the move is aimed at bolstering the financial strength of China’s biggest banks and reduce systemic risks, it may widen the funding gap at some lenders. Industrial & Commercial Bank of China, Bank of China, Construction Bank and Agricultural Bank of China are all considered global systemically important banks, or G-SIBs. They need to find as much as $990 billion by 2024 to meet global capital requirements designed to protect the public and financial system against massive bank failures, S&P Global Ratings estimated last year.

G-SIBs in emerging markets must have liabilities and instruments available to “bail in” the equivalent to at least 16 per cent of risk-weighted assets by Jan. 1, 2025, rising to 18 per cent in 2028, according to the Basel-based Financial Stability Board.

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First Published: Fri, April 02 2021. 22:08 IST
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