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No such thing as trivial crime, UK's Suella Braverman tells police

The 43-year-old Indian-origin Cabinet minister in charge of security issues said there was no such thing as trivial crimes because criminals should fear the consequences of their actions

Suella Braverman

She warned that serious crimes flourish when lower-level criminality and anti-social behaviour are not tackled with the full force of the law | Photo: Bloomberg

Press Trust of India London

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UK Home Secretary Suella Braverman on Monday called on the country's police force to investigate every crime, saying it is "unacceptable" that crimes such as shoplifting, criminal damage and phone or car theft are treated as "less important".
The 43-year-old Indian-origin Cabinet minister in charge of security issues said there was no such thing as trivial crimes because criminals should fear the consequences of their actions.
She warned that serious crimes flourish when lower-level criminality and anti-social behaviour are not tackled with the full force of the law.
We know that the most serious crimes flourish when lower-level criminality and antisocial behaviour are not tackled. Theft and burglary can often be run by organised crime gangs, Braverman writes in The Daily Telegraph' newspaper.
But let's be clear: all crime matters. There is no such thing as a trivial crime. And the police must not indicate to criminals that they are effectively free to break certain laws. Since I became Home Secretary last year, I've been determined to drive forward a return to common-sense policing and values, she said.
Her intervention follows talks between the UK Home Office, the National Police Chiefs' Council (NPCC) and the College of Policing, the professional body for policing staff as part of a so-called crime week of policy announcements planned by the government.
This government has secured a commitment from police forces that they will do just that. It is vital for victims and for wider society that perpetrators face justice. Improved public confidence in policing depends on it," Braverman noted.
The commitment applies to all crimes and action should still be proportionate, but we expect to see a radical change in the way the police approach theft, shoplifting and criminal damage.
"Every use must be made of things like CCTV, doorbell videos, GPS trackers, and witness accounts. This builds on the work we are doing to tackle flagrant and antisocial drug use and dealing in our streets, she said.
The minister stressed that neither she nor the British public have time for the sob stories of those committing crimes.
Anyone who breaks the law should feel its full force. This government is on the side of the decent, law-abiding majority. That's why we have sent the police a clear message: we are right behind you in tackling every kind of crime. Now it's time for action, she added.
The Opposition Labour Party branded the announcement as a "staggering admission of 13 years of Tory failure on policing and crime".
"Pursuing reasonable leads like CCTV is what the police should be doing, but because of abysmal Tory management over 90 per cent of crimes go unsolved, the proportion of crimes prosecuted has dropped by more than two thirds and more criminals are getting off," said Yvette Cooper, the shadow home secretary.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Topics : UK crimes

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First Published: Aug 28 2023 | 2:44 PM IST

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