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Hundreds of drivers protest in front of Ola's office in Bengaluru

The drivers were protesting against falling earnings as incentive payouts have reduced

Alnoor Peermohamed  |  Bengaluru 

Ola and Uber taxi drivers shout slogans during the Fifth day of their strike against withdrawal of incentives by the app-based cab aggregators, at Jantar Mantar in New Delhi. Photo: PTI
Ola and Uber taxi drivers shout slogans during the Fifth day of their strike against withdrawal of incentives by the app-based cab aggregators, at Jantar Mantar in New Delhi. Photo: PTI

Hundreds of drivers attached to India’s largest taxi aggregator protested outside one of the company’s offices in East Bengaluru, as they stepped up their demand for higher earnings which they claim the company had promised when the joined.

The drivers, who began their on February 15 were protesting against falling earnings on platforms such as and as incentive payouts have reduced. Several of them claimed they were unable to pay back the EMIs on the cars they’d purchased after being promised hefty earnings by the two companies.

did not respond to an email sent by Business Standard, while an spokesperson could not be reached.

The by drivers in comes on the back of a similar by drivers on both platforms in Delhi which entered the seventh day on Thursday. The Delhi government is looking to intervene to get drivers to end their indefinite and return to work.

Protests against and have become a phenomenon, with strikes across cities such as Hyderabad, Chennai, Mumbai and Kolkata besides and Delhi. The reason is largely the same across cities, with drivers complaining of falling earnings on the hand of both companies reducing earnings.

In the past few months, both taxi aggregators have moved away from paying incentives to drivers on the number of daily trips, instead of moving to an earnings-based incentive payout. However, as both companies have dropped fares significantly, drivers say their ability to earn more and thereby qualify for higher incentives has been reduced.

Moreover, with the number of cars on and going up across cities, drivers say their individual businesses have dropped. Estimates suggest that there are over 1 lakh cabs attached to these two platforms in the cities of and New Delhi, with Mumbai not being far behind.

While authorities have tried to intervene, they have said that the matter needs to largely be resolved between the two companies and the drivers. The drivers on and are not employees, but rather independent workers who use the platform to drive business for themselves.

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Hundreds of drivers protest in front of Ola's office in Bengaluru

The drivers were protesting against falling earnings as incentive payouts have reduced

The drivers were protesting against falling earnings as incentive payouts have reduced
Hundreds of drivers attached to India’s largest taxi aggregator protested outside one of the company’s offices in East Bengaluru, as they stepped up their demand for higher earnings which they claim the company had promised when the joined.

The drivers, who began their on February 15 were protesting against falling earnings on platforms such as and as incentive payouts have reduced. Several of them claimed they were unable to pay back the EMIs on the cars they’d purchased after being promised hefty earnings by the two companies.

did not respond to an email sent by Business Standard, while an spokesperson could not be reached.

The by drivers in comes on the back of a similar by drivers on both platforms in Delhi which entered the seventh day on Thursday. The Delhi government is looking to intervene to get drivers to end their indefinite and return to work.

Protests against and have become a phenomenon, with strikes across cities such as Hyderabad, Chennai, Mumbai and Kolkata besides and Delhi. The reason is largely the same across cities, with drivers complaining of falling earnings on the hand of both companies reducing earnings.

In the past few months, both taxi aggregators have moved away from paying incentives to drivers on the number of daily trips, instead of moving to an earnings-based incentive payout. However, as both companies have dropped fares significantly, drivers say their ability to earn more and thereby qualify for higher incentives has been reduced.

Moreover, with the number of cars on and going up across cities, drivers say their individual businesses have dropped. Estimates suggest that there are over 1 lakh cabs attached to these two platforms in the cities of and New Delhi, with Mumbai not being far behind.

While authorities have tried to intervene, they have said that the matter needs to largely be resolved between the two companies and the drivers. The drivers on and are not employees, but rather independent workers who use the platform to drive business for themselves.
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Business Standard
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Hundreds of drivers protest in front of Ola's office in Bengaluru

The drivers were protesting against falling earnings as incentive payouts have reduced

Hundreds of drivers attached to India’s largest taxi aggregator protested outside one of the company’s offices in East Bengaluru, as they stepped up their demand for higher earnings which they claim the company had promised when the joined.

The drivers, who began their on February 15 were protesting against falling earnings on platforms such as and as incentive payouts have reduced. Several of them claimed they were unable to pay back the EMIs on the cars they’d purchased after being promised hefty earnings by the two companies.

did not respond to an email sent by Business Standard, while an spokesperson could not be reached.

The by drivers in comes on the back of a similar by drivers on both platforms in Delhi which entered the seventh day on Thursday. The Delhi government is looking to intervene to get drivers to end their indefinite and return to work.

Protests against and have become a phenomenon, with strikes across cities such as Hyderabad, Chennai, Mumbai and Kolkata besides and Delhi. The reason is largely the same across cities, with drivers complaining of falling earnings on the hand of both companies reducing earnings.

In the past few months, both taxi aggregators have moved away from paying incentives to drivers on the number of daily trips, instead of moving to an earnings-based incentive payout. However, as both companies have dropped fares significantly, drivers say their ability to earn more and thereby qualify for higher incentives has been reduced.

Moreover, with the number of cars on and going up across cities, drivers say their individual businesses have dropped. Estimates suggest that there are over 1 lakh cabs attached to these two platforms in the cities of and New Delhi, with Mumbai not being far behind.

While authorities have tried to intervene, they have said that the matter needs to largely be resolved between the two companies and the drivers. The drivers on and are not employees, but rather independent workers who use the platform to drive business for themselves.

image
Business Standard
177 22