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Elements inside Pakistan army had links to Al-Qaeda: Barack Obama

In his latest book, America's first Black president described the various options of killing Bin Laden once it became increasingly clear that the elusive Al Qaeda chief was living in Pakistan

Topics
Barack Obama | Osama Bin Laden | Pakistan army

Press Trust of India  |  Washington 

“My advice to President Trump is, if you want at this late stage in the game to be remembered as somebody who put country first, it’s time for you to do the same thing,” Obama said
The former US president said that the top secret operation was opposed by the then defence secretary Robert Gates and his former vice-president Joe Biden, who is now the president-elect

has said that he had ruled out involving Pakistan in the raid on Osama bin Laden's hideout because it was an “open secret” that certain elements inside Pakistan's military, and especially its intelligence services, maintained links to the Taliban and perhaps even Al-Qaeda, sometimes using them as strategic assets against Afghanistan and India.

Giving a blow-by-blow account of the Abbottabad raid by American commandos that killed the world's most wanted terrorist on May 2, 2011 in his latest book, A Promised Land, the former US president said that the top secret operation was opposed by the then defence secretary Robert Gates and his former vice-president Joe Biden, who is now the president-elect.

In the book that hit the stands globally on Tuesday, America’s first Black president described the various options of killing Bin Laden once it became increasingly clear that the elusive Al Qaeda chief was living in a safe hideout on the outskirts of a Pakistani military cantonment in Abbottabad. “Based on what I'd heard, I decided we had enough information to begin developing options for an attack on the compound,” Obama writes in his memoir.

“The need for secrecy added to the challenge; if even the slightest hint of our lead on Bin Laden leaked, we knew our opportunity would be lost. “We had one other constraint: Whatever option we chose could not involve the Pakistanis,” he wrote.

“Although Pakistan's government cooperated with us on a host of counterterrorism operations and provided a vital supply path for our forces in Afghanistan, it was an open secret that certain elements inside the country's military, and especially its intelligence services, maintained links to the Taliban and perhaps even al-Qaeda, sometimes using them as strategic assets to ensure that the Afghan government remained weak and unable to align itself with Pakistan's number one rival, India,” Obama revealed.

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First Published: Tue, November 17 2020. 23:35 IST
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