You are here: Home » News-ANI » Health
Business Standard

Giving kids antibiotics may alter their development

ANI 

A new study has revealed that repeated courses of antibiotics may profoundly alter the children's development.

In the animal study by NYU Langone Medical Center, female mice treated with two classes of widely used childhood antibiotics gained more weight and developed larger bones than untreated mice. Both of the antibiotics also disrupted the gut microbiome, the trillions of microbes that inhabit the intestinal tract.

Senior author Martin Blaser cautions that the study was limited to mice. Even so, he says the results agree with multiple other studies pointing toward significant effects on children exposed to antibiotics early in life and he notes that the cumulative data could help shape guidelines governing the duration and type of pediatric prescriptions.

People have been using antibiotics as if there was no biological cost, says Blaser. The average child in the United States, he says, receives 10 courses of the drugs by the age of 10.

The new study found that short, high-dose pulses of tylosin had the most pronounced and long-lasting effect on weight gain, while amoxicillin had the biggest effect on bone growth, a prerequisite for increased height.

Based on extensive DNA sequencing data, the study showed that antibiotics also disrupted the gut microbiome. They changed the ecology of the microbiome in terms of the richness of the organisms, the diversity, and also what we call the community structure, or the nature of its composition, Blaser added.

The drugs altered not only the bacterial species, but also the relative numbers of microbial genes linked to specific metabolic functions.

The study is published online in journal Nature Communications.

Dear Reader,


Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.
We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

First Published: Wed, July 01 2015. 11:10 IST
RECOMMENDED FOR YOU
RECOMMENDED FOR YOU