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Contempt of court written in law but must be limited to disobeying orders

The contempt provision draws its strength from a Latin term going back 2,000 years - ipse dixit, which means because 'I say so' or when appropriate because 'someone says so'

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T C A Srinivasa-Raghavan
A huge amount has been written and said about the decision of the Supreme Court to hold Prashant Bhushan, a lawyer, guilty of contempt of court. I have only one thing to add, namely that a conviction for contempt is as much permitted in India as capital punishment is.

The contempt provision draws its strength from a Latin term going back 2,000 years — ipse dixit, which means because “I say so” or when appropriate because “someone says so”. Nothing further is required to reach a conclusion of truth.

Judges use it in two ways. One is when they want
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First Published: Aug 29 2020 | 1:00 AM IST

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