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Maratha Morcha in Mumbai: Protestors term Fadnavis' proposals insufficient

Fadnavis said he would extend to Maratha community educational concessions currently given to OBCs

Agencies  |  Mumbai 

Maratha march in Mumbai ends on a happy note as Fadnavis announces sops
Maratha march in Mumbai

Holding aloft saffron flags, millions of Maratha community members Wednesday filled the city's streets as they took their battle for reservation in government and to the capital, throwing traffic haywire and putting the overburdened suburban railway under severe strain.

The metropolis turned into a sea of saffron as members of the politically influential community from different parts of the state converged here to press for reservation in government and among other demands.

The Marathas took out a silent march from Jijamata Udyan in Byculla to Azad Maidan in South Mumbai.

As the agitators assembled at Azad Maidan, Mumbai's protest hotpsot, a few kilometres away, in Vidhan Bhawan, Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis announced his government would extend to the Maratha community the educational concessions currently given to OBCs.

Protesters dismissed as insufficient a proposal by the chief minister of state, Devendra Fadnavis, to consider granting reservations to the Maratha community, which is mainly dependent on farming.

"We are not satisfied with the government's promises. The Chief Minister hasn't given any concrete assurances to solve farmers' problems," said Bhaiya Patil, one of the rally organisers.

He also said the BJP-led government would form a cabinet sub-committee to review the implementation of various welfare schemes meant for the Maratha community, but stopped short of announcing quotas for them in

The announcements were made after Fadnavis held a meeting with representatives of the Maratha community, whose demands have received support from almost the entire political spectrum in the state.

A delegation of 40 people, including women, met him at the Vidhan Bhawan this afternoon. The legislature is currently having its monsoon session.

Earlier this morning, the Marathas took out their silent march from Jijamata Udyan amid tight security with participants wearing saffron caps and carrying saffron swallowtail flags.

Police and traffic personnel were deployed in large numbers to manage the huge inflow of people and the movement of vehicles in Mumbai.

Mumbai's famed 'Dabbawalas' (lunchbox deliverymen), majority of whom hail from the Maratha community, also joined the march.

This was the 58th march of the community and was held exactly a year after the first such protest in Aurangabad. The march was organised by the Sakal Maratha Samaj, an umbrella organisation of several Maratha groups.

According to police, around 3 lakh people took part in the protest march.

These 'mook morcha', or silent rallies, were held in various parts of the state following the brutal rape and murder of a 14-year-old girl, belonging to the Maratha community, at Kopardi village in Ahmednagar district in July 2016.

The rally ended at Azad Maidan after covering a distance of 10km. At the venue, the campaigners raised slogans as Mumbai BJP chief Ashish Shelar reached the site. Some said they don't want politicians to interfere. Shelar rubbished reports he was stopped and manhandled at Azad Maidan.

In the legislature, lawmakers cutting across party lines shouted slogans demanding quota for the Marathas.

Social media platforms like Facebook, WhatsApp and Twitter were used to mobilise the community members, the organisers said.

Quotas for Marathas, a politically influential community that constitutes around 30 per cent of the state's population, has been a hugely contentious issue.

The Bombay High Court had in 2014 disallowed 16 per cent reservation for them in government services and educational institutions.

In 2003-04, Commission for Backward Classes rejected the demand for including Maratha community in the category of Other Backward Class (OBC) category. Earlier, 1980 Mandal Commission had noted that the Maratha community is a forward class in

The State Backward Class Commission had held in 2008 that "Marathas are both economically and politically a forward caste. They never faced social stigma to invite the backward class status.

First Published: Thu, August 10 2017. 10:20 IST
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