Business Standard

Villain as Wall Street pioneer

But here's the strange thing: Roosevelt denounced Gould primarily for his use of a "fraudulent corporation," the Manhattan Elevated Railroad. Why did he call it fraudulent?

Book review
Premium

T J STILES | NYT
On April 5, 1882, Theodore Roosevelt stood in the New York State Assembly and demanded an investigation. The indignant 23-year-old accused a clique of “swindlers,” “wealthy stock gamblers,” “men whose financial dishonesty is a matter of common notoriety,” of corruptly monopolising New York City’s elevated railroads. The plot’s mastermind, he implied, was Jay Gould.
 
Three cheers for the bad guy. The villain seizes control of the story, scheming, lying and betraying to get what he wants. And Jay Gould, the subject of Greg Steinmetz’s concise new biography, makes an excellent villain. Endlessly resourceful, utterly self-interested, he authored “the blackest pages
Topics : BOOK REVIEW

Don't miss the most important news and views of the day. Get them on our Telegram channel

First Published: Aug 28 2022 | 11:49 PM IST

Explore News

To read the full story, subscribe to BS Premium now, at just Rs 249/ month.

Key stories on business-standard.com are available only to BS Premium subscribers.

Register to read more on Business-Standard.com