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AAP has adopted zero tolerance against corruption: Kejriwal

Press Trust of India  |  Samana 

Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) convener and Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal today said his party has adopted zero tolerance against corruption and the time is ripe in Punjab to end the "corrupt regime" of SAD-BJP combine.

"In Delhi we have already shown that AAP has adopted zero tolerance against corruption by throwing out even our own party leaders, who were found indulged in corruption," he said addressing a gathering on the 5th day of his 11-day tour of Punjab.

"When I came to know that one of my ministers was trying to seek Rs six lakh bribe, I immediately threw him out of my cabinet," Kejriwal said, claiming that even the Opposition as well as media did not have any clue about corruption of AAP minister.

On the other hand, Akali ministers Tota Singh and Bikram Majithia have been accused of corruption and drugs, but Chief Minister Parkash Singh Badal failed to act against them, he alleged adding similarly it is in common knowledge that Congress leaders Sajjan Kumar and Jagdish Tytler were involved in the anti-Sikhs riots in 1984 at Delhi, but Congress failed to act against them.

He also alleged that Badal and Punjab Congress chief Amarinder Singh were the most corrupt politicians of Punjab and "AAP has already proved its mettle as far as its stand against corruption is concerned".

On the demontisation of Rs 500/1000 notes, Kejriwal said Prime Minister Narendra Modi was only making fool of the people as it has actually benefitted business tycoons.

"If Modi actually wants to bring black money out, then Badals, who have amassed biggest chunk of black money in Punjab and Amarinder Singh, who stashed black money in the Swiss bank should have been brought back," he said.

"There cannot be any dearth of money with any state governments, if they use every single penny of available fund at its optimistic level," the Delhi Chief Minister said.

Here in Punjab, it was not lack of money, but lack of political will in Badals and Amarinder, that multiplied the woes of state, he added.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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First Published: Thu, November 24 2016. 19:42 IST
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