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India ranks bottom of Oxfam world inequality index

Press Trust of India  |  London 

has been ranked among the bottom 10 countries in a new worldwide index released on Tuesday on the commitment of different nations to reduce inequalities in their populations.

UK-based charity International's 'Commitment to Reducing (CRI) Index' ranks 147th among 157 countries analysed, describing the country's commitment to reducing as a "a very worrying situation" given that it is home to 1.3 billion people, many of whom live in extreme poverty.

"has calculated that if were to reduce by a third, more than 170 million people would no longer be poor," the index notes.

"Government spending on health, education and social protection is woefully low and often subsidises the private sector. has consistently campaigned for increased spending," it adds.

The second edition of the annual index finds that countries such as South Korea, and are taking strong steps to reduce inequality. However, countries such as India and "do very badly" overall, as does the US among rich countries, showing what describes as a lack of commitment to closing the inequality gap.

In reference to India, the index finds that while the tax structure looks reasonably progressive on paper, in practice much of the progressive taxation, like that on the incomes of the richest, is not collected.

India also fares poorly on labour rights and respect for women in the workplace, reflecting the fact that the majority of the labour force is employed in the agricultural and informal sectors, which lack union organisation and enforcement of gender rights.

The index is based on a new database of indicators, now covering 157 countries, which measures government action on social spending, tax and labour rights three areas found to be critical to reducing the gap.

The index is topped by Denmark, based on its high and progressive taxation, high social spending and good protection of workers.

"However, recent Danish governments have focused on reversing all three of these to some extent, with a view to liberalising the economy, and recent research reveals that the reforms of the past 15 years have led to a rapid increase in inequality of nearly 20 per cent between 2005 and 2015," it warns.

Japan, the top-ranking Asian country, came in at 11th on the index. The report lauded Moon Jae-in of South Korea, which came in 56th overall, for showing commitment to tackling inequality in the country in the past year by raising tax on the richest earners, boosting spending for the poor and dramatically raising the minimum wage.

It also cited other countries that have taken strong steps to tackle inequality in the past year. Ethiopia, although at the 131st place, now has the sixth highest level of education spending in the world. Chile, at 35th, increased its rate of corporation tax and Indonesia, at 90th, has increased its minimum wage and spending on health, the report noted.

The analysis, by Oxfam and group (DFI), recommends that all countries should develop national inequality action plans to achieve the UN's Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) on reducing inequality.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

First Published: Tue, October 09 2018. 18:40 IST
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