You are here: Home » International » News » Others
Business Standard

Insider attack kills nine Afghan militia, Taliban claims responsibility

The Taliban now control or hold sway over half the country

Topics
afghanistan taliban | Taliban | Kabul

AP | PTI  |  Kabul 

terrorism
Photo: Shutterstock

At least one member of an Afghan militia opened fire on his fellow militiamen early Saturday, killing nine, in what the country's interior ministry called an insider attack.

The however claimed the attack was actually a coordinated insurgent assault on the checkpoint where the shooting took place, killing over two dozen militiamen, according to spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid.

There was no immediate explanation for the discrepancy, but the often exaggerate their claims.

Details were sketchy and investigators were still looking into the attack in central Ghazni province's Karabagh district, said Interior Ministry spokesman Fawad Aman. The number of attackers was also not immediately clear.

Afghan militias operate in remote regions and are under the command of the country's National Security Forces, which suffers near daily Taliban attacks.

The Taliban now control or hold sway over half the country.

Insider attacks have been steady throughout the 18-year conflict, with U.S. and NATO troops most often targeted. But when Afghan security forces are targeted, the casualty rate is often much higher.

In July, two US service members were killed by an Afghan soldier in the southern Kandahar province. The shooter was wounded and arrested. In September, three US military personnel were wounded when an member of the Afghan Civil Order Police fired on a military convoy, also in Kandahar.

Last Saturday, U.S. peace envoy Zalmay Khalilzad began several days of meetings with Taliban representatives in Qatar, where the insurgents maintain a political office.

It was his first such direct contact between the envoy and the militant group since President Donald Trump halted negotiations three months ago after a particularly deadly wave of Taliban attacks, including a suicide bombing that killed an American soldier.

Dear Reader,


Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.
We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

First Published: Sat, December 14 2019. 14:10 IST
RECOMMENDED FOR YOU
.