You are here: Home » International » News » Companies
Business Standard

Nestle scientists find method to cut sugar in chocolate by 40%

Nestle has developed a process to alter the structure of sugar that makes it taste sweeter in smaller amounts

Bloomberg 

Chocolate
Photo: Nestle

SA says it found a way to reduce the amount of in by as much as 40 per cent, a discovery that may give the KitKat maker an edge as producers face increasing pressure from governments, advocates and shoppers to make products healthier.

The world’s largest company has developed a process to alter the structure of that makes it taste sweeter in smaller amounts, according to Chief Technology Officer Stefan Catsicas, who declined to specify what that involves. will start selling confectionery products made that way in 2018 and will gradually reduce their content, he said in an interview.

Big companies that also include International Inc. and Inc. are scrambling to create healthier products to reduce their reliance on treats laden with and salt. It comes as the UK, Mexico and some US cities implement taxes to help fight childhood obesity and diabetes, which affects four times as many people now than in 1980. The World Organization has said increasing the price of sugary drinks by 20 per cent would reduce consumption by a fifth.

“We want people to get used to a different taste, a taste that would be more natural,” Catsicas said. “We really want to be the drivers of the solution.” is seeking to patent the sugar-reduction process, which Catsicas wouldn’t describe in detail, but likened to making crystals that are “hollow.” The crystals dissolve more quickly, stimulating the taste buds faster, he said. Unprocessed has complex structures, which is trying to mimic by distributing the in a less uniform way.

“If you look with an electron microscope into an apple, that’s exactly what you see,” said Nestle’s top researcher, days before the UK government shares details on its proposed tax.

Real in nature is not something smooth and homogeneous. It’s full of cavities, crests and densities. So by reproducing this variability, we are capable to restore the same sensation.”

To avoid any sudden change in the taste of its chocolate, the maker of the Butterfinger and Cailler brands plans to use the new technology to reduce content gradually, according to Catsicas, a former biology professor and GlaxoSmithKline Plc executive. He compared the strategy to his own experience using less in his coffee, making a small reduction each week. After three months, he took his coffee unsweetened.

Not Alone

isn’t alone in research on altering the consistency of sugar. Leatherhead Research, a U.K. institute whose 100 scientists consult for companies, has been studying how to shrink the size of crystals or coat around low-calorie ingredients. The approach has also been tried on salt.

“If it works for salt, I assume it could work for sugar,” said Joanne Slavin, a professor of science and nutrition at the University of Minnesota. “Price is another complicating factor: if this new is much more expensive than sugar, it will increase cost.” An additional challenge is that less can change the feel of a product in the mouth.

declined to say whether it will use the technology in other product categories, as it’s waiting for the patent to be published, a spokesman said. The potential 40 percent reduction isn’t a formal target, and has yet to announce its 2017 goals for cutting use.

The company has used a similar approach in ice cream, where it makes Dreyer’s with a “slow-churned” method that reduces fat by half and calories by a third. It’s trying to apply the restructuring method to salt, Catsicas said, and may consider licensing the technology to other companies.

“I would have no problem with that,” he said. “If we can make a good business case, if we can get the returns that we deserve, then why not?”

RECOMMENDED FOR YOU

Nestle scientists find method to cut sugar in chocolate by 40%

Nestle has developed a process to alter the structure of sugar that makes it taste sweeter in smaller amounts

Nestle has developed a process to alter the structure of sugar that makes it taste sweeter in smaller amounts
SA says it found a way to reduce the amount of in by as much as 40 per cent, a discovery that may give the KitKat maker an edge as producers face increasing pressure from governments, advocates and shoppers to make products healthier.

The world’s largest company has developed a process to alter the structure of that makes it taste sweeter in smaller amounts, according to Chief Technology Officer Stefan Catsicas, who declined to specify what that involves. will start selling confectionery products made that way in 2018 and will gradually reduce their content, he said in an interview.

Big companies that also include International Inc. and Inc. are scrambling to create healthier products to reduce their reliance on treats laden with and salt. It comes as the UK, Mexico and some US cities implement taxes to help fight childhood obesity and diabetes, which affects four times as many people now than in 1980. The World Organization has said increasing the price of sugary drinks by 20 per cent would reduce consumption by a fifth.

“We want people to get used to a different taste, a taste that would be more natural,” Catsicas said. “We really want to be the drivers of the solution.” is seeking to patent the sugar-reduction process, which Catsicas wouldn’t describe in detail, but likened to making crystals that are “hollow.” The crystals dissolve more quickly, stimulating the taste buds faster, he said. Unprocessed has complex structures, which is trying to mimic by distributing the in a less uniform way.

“If you look with an electron microscope into an apple, that’s exactly what you see,” said Nestle’s top researcher, days before the UK government shares details on its proposed tax.

Real in nature is not something smooth and homogeneous. It’s full of cavities, crests and densities. So by reproducing this variability, we are capable to restore the same sensation.”

To avoid any sudden change in the taste of its chocolate, the maker of the Butterfinger and Cailler brands plans to use the new technology to reduce content gradually, according to Catsicas, a former biology professor and GlaxoSmithKline Plc executive. He compared the strategy to his own experience using less in his coffee, making a small reduction each week. After three months, he took his coffee unsweetened.

Not Alone

isn’t alone in research on altering the consistency of sugar. Leatherhead Research, a U.K. institute whose 100 scientists consult for companies, has been studying how to shrink the size of crystals or coat around low-calorie ingredients. The approach has also been tried on salt.

“If it works for salt, I assume it could work for sugar,” said Joanne Slavin, a professor of science and nutrition at the University of Minnesota. “Price is another complicating factor: if this new is much more expensive than sugar, it will increase cost.” An additional challenge is that less can change the feel of a product in the mouth.

declined to say whether it will use the technology in other product categories, as it’s waiting for the patent to be published, a spokesman said. The potential 40 percent reduction isn’t a formal target, and has yet to announce its 2017 goals for cutting use.

The company has used a similar approach in ice cream, where it makes Dreyer’s with a “slow-churned” method that reduces fat by half and calories by a third. It’s trying to apply the restructuring method to salt, Catsicas said, and may consider licensing the technology to other companies.

“I would have no problem with that,” he said. “If we can make a good business case, if we can get the returns that we deserve, then why not?”

image
Business Standard
177 22

Nestle scientists find method to cut sugar in chocolate by 40%

Nestle has developed a process to alter the structure of sugar that makes it taste sweeter in smaller amounts

SA says it found a way to reduce the amount of in by as much as 40 per cent, a discovery that may give the KitKat maker an edge as producers face increasing pressure from governments, advocates and shoppers to make products healthier.

The world’s largest company has developed a process to alter the structure of that makes it taste sweeter in smaller amounts, according to Chief Technology Officer Stefan Catsicas, who declined to specify what that involves. will start selling confectionery products made that way in 2018 and will gradually reduce their content, he said in an interview.

Big companies that also include International Inc. and Inc. are scrambling to create healthier products to reduce their reliance on treats laden with and salt. It comes as the UK, Mexico and some US cities implement taxes to help fight childhood obesity and diabetes, which affects four times as many people now than in 1980. The World Organization has said increasing the price of sugary drinks by 20 per cent would reduce consumption by a fifth.

“We want people to get used to a different taste, a taste that would be more natural,” Catsicas said. “We really want to be the drivers of the solution.” is seeking to patent the sugar-reduction process, which Catsicas wouldn’t describe in detail, but likened to making crystals that are “hollow.” The crystals dissolve more quickly, stimulating the taste buds faster, he said. Unprocessed has complex structures, which is trying to mimic by distributing the in a less uniform way.

“If you look with an electron microscope into an apple, that’s exactly what you see,” said Nestle’s top researcher, days before the UK government shares details on its proposed tax.

Real in nature is not something smooth and homogeneous. It’s full of cavities, crests and densities. So by reproducing this variability, we are capable to restore the same sensation.”

To avoid any sudden change in the taste of its chocolate, the maker of the Butterfinger and Cailler brands plans to use the new technology to reduce content gradually, according to Catsicas, a former biology professor and GlaxoSmithKline Plc executive. He compared the strategy to his own experience using less in his coffee, making a small reduction each week. After three months, he took his coffee unsweetened.

Not Alone

isn’t alone in research on altering the consistency of sugar. Leatherhead Research, a U.K. institute whose 100 scientists consult for companies, has been studying how to shrink the size of crystals or coat around low-calorie ingredients. The approach has also been tried on salt.

“If it works for salt, I assume it could work for sugar,” said Joanne Slavin, a professor of science and nutrition at the University of Minnesota. “Price is another complicating factor: if this new is much more expensive than sugar, it will increase cost.” An additional challenge is that less can change the feel of a product in the mouth.

declined to say whether it will use the technology in other product categories, as it’s waiting for the patent to be published, a spokesman said. The potential 40 percent reduction isn’t a formal target, and has yet to announce its 2017 goals for cutting use.

The company has used a similar approach in ice cream, where it makes Dreyer’s with a “slow-churned” method that reduces fat by half and calories by a third. It’s trying to apply the restructuring method to salt, Catsicas said, and may consider licensing the technology to other companies.

“I would have no problem with that,” he said. “If we can make a good business case, if we can get the returns that we deserve, then why not?”

image
Business Standard
177 22

Upgrade To Premium Services

Welcome User

Business Standard is happy to inform you of the launch of "Business Standard Premium Services"

As a premium subscriber you get an across device unfettered access to a range of services which include:

  • Access Exclusive content - articles, features & opinion pieces
  • Weekly Industry/Genre specific newsletters - Choose multiple industries/genres
  • Access to 17 plus years of content archives
  • Set Stock price alerts for your portfolio and watch list and get them delivered to your e-mail box
  • End of day news alerts on 5 companies (via email)
  • NEW: Get seamless access to WSJ.com at a great price. No additional sign-up required.
 

Premium Services

In Partnership with

 

Dear Guest,

 

Welcome to the premium services of Business Standard brought to you courtesy FIS.
Kindly visit the Manage my subscription page to discover the benefits of this programme.

Enjoy Reading!
Team Business Standard