You are here: Home » News-ANI » Health
Business Standard

Gujarat's Chiranjeevi Yojana program fails to improve maternal health in India

ANI  |  Washington 

A new study has suggested that the Chiranjeevi Yojana program in Gujarat, that claimed to reduce infant and maternal deaths in rural India by encouraging mothers to deliver in private hospitals, has been unsuccessful, despite the investment of more than 25 million dollars since 2005.

The program was launched in 2006 to help address the shortage of obstetricians at public hospitals accessible to low-income women in rural areas. It aimed to provide free childbirth care at participating private-sector hospitals to women who are below the poverty line.

The hospitals are paid 1600 rupees per delivery. The hospitals may offer additional services to patients and charge separate fees for them. By 2012, approximately 800 private-sector hospitals were participating and the program had helped pay for more than 800,000 deliveries.

Lead researcher Manoj Mohanan from Duke University along with his team surveyed 5,597 households in Gujarat to collect data on births that had occurred between 2005 and 2010.

They found no statistically significant change in the probability of delivery in care institutions, the probability of obstetric complications or the probability that physicians or nurses were present during childbirth.

While the study did not determine why patients' delivery costs did not decline or why the program is ineffective, several explanations are possible, Mohanan said.

Media reports in India suggest that despite the promise of free care, hospitals were billing women for extra, chargeable services. Providers also complained that the reimbursement amounts were not adequate to cover costs of providing the service.

In addition, mothers may perceive the quality of care at participating private hospitals to be poor, so even when the care is provided for free, demand does not rise. Transportation costs from rural villages also could be a factor, he said.

The study is published in journal Bulletin of the World Organization.

Dear Reader,


Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.
We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

First Published: Thu, December 12 2013. 10:57 IST
RECOMMENDED FOR YOU
RECOMMENDED FOR YOU