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Coronavirus causes less severe illness in children than adults: Govt

Bharati Pravin Pawar was responding to a question on whether the children are getting affected by the coronavirus infection in the country

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"According to World Health Organization, SARS-CoV-2 infections among children and adolescents typically cause less severe illness as compared to adult," Pawar said

Press Trust of India New Delhi
Coronavirus infections among children and adolescents typically cause less severe illness as compared to adults, according to the WHO, the government informed the Lok Sabha on Friday.
Omicron and its sub-lineages have been found in 7,362 samples while Delta and its sub-lineages were detected in 118 samples analyzed by the INSACOG from January 1 2022 to July 25, 2022 in children aged 0-18 years, Union Minister of State for Health Bharati Pravin Pawar said in a written reply.
Pawar was responding to a question on whether the children are getting affected by the coronavirus infection in the country and the current status of vaccination of children in the age group of 12-18 years and 5-12 years.
"According to World Health Organization, SARS-CoV-2 infections among children and adolescents typically cause less severe illness as compared to adult," Pawar said.
As on July 26 this year, 9.96 crore first doses (82.2 per cent coverage) and 7.79 crore second doses (64.3 per cent coverage) have been administered in children between 12-18 years of age.
Vaccination below 12 years of age has not started under the national Covid-19 vaccination programme in the country, she said, adding adequate vaccine doses are made available to all states and union territories to vaccinate all eligible children.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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First Published: Jul 30 2022 | 12:45 AM IST

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