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Get over fingerprint, retina and face, your brain may soon be your password

Every person's brain responds differently to an external stimulus, so even if two people look at the same photograph, readings of their brain activity will be different

Three electrodes high on the back of a user’s head are enough to detect a brain password. Wenyao Xu et al., CC BY-ND
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Three electrodes high on the back of a user’s head are enough to detect a brain password. Wenyao Xu et al., CC BY-ND

Wenyao Xu, Feng Lin & Zhanpeng Jin | The Wire
Your brain is an inexhaustible source of secure passwords – but you might not have to remember anything. Passwords and PINs with letters and numbers are relatively easily hacked, hard to remember and generally insecure. Biometrics are starting to take their place, with fingerprints, facial recognition and retina scanning becoming common even in routine logins for computers, smartphones and other common devices.

They’re more secure because they’re harder to fake, but biometrics have a crucial vulnerability: A person only has one face, two retinas and 10 fingerprints. They represent passwords that can’t be reset if they’re compromised.

Like usernames and passwords, biometric

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First Published: Oct 29 2018 | 8:17 AM IST

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