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Heatwave abates from all parts of country, says IMD's latest forecast

Heatwave has abated from all parts of the country and the maximum temperature has further fallen by two to four degrees Celsius over Rajasthan, Punjab, Delhi and Haryana, the IMD said on Tuesday.

Topics
IMD | Indian Meteorological Department | Heatwave in India

Press Trust of India  |  New Delhi 

Motorists shield themselves from the sun in Bhopal, Friday, April 29, 2022. (PTI Photo)
Motorists shield themselves from the sun in Bhopal, Friday, April 29, 2022. (PTI Photo)

Heatwave has abated from all parts of the country and the maximum temperature has further fallen by two to four degrees Celsius over Rajasthan, Punjab, Delhi and Haryana, the India Meteorological Department said on Tuesday.

No part of northwest, central and east India is likely to record a heatwave over the next five days, the MeT office said.

No significant change is predicted in the maximum temperature over most parts of northwest India and central India during the next two to three days. The mercury is likely to increase by two to three degrees Celsius thereafter, it said in a statement.

Heatwave conditions will return to some parts of Maharashtra from Wednesday and isolated areas of Rajasthan from Friday, the India Meteorological Department (IMD) said.

Under the influence of a Western Disturbance, isolated light rainfall, dust storm, and thunderstorm with winds gusting up to 50 kmph is very likely over Punjab, Haryana, Uttar Pradesh and Rajasthan during the next two days.

With scanty rains owing to feeble western disturbances, northwest and central India experienced the hottest April in 122 years as the average maximum temperature touched 35.9 degrees Celsius and 37.78 degrees Celsius, respectively.

Several places in the country had logged all-time high temperatures for April with the mercury leaping to 46-47 degrees Celsius under the impact of the torrid heatwave.

Banda in east Uttar Pradesh had logged a record high of 47.4 degrees Celsius for April on Friday.

Allahabad, Jhansi and Lucknow in Uttar Pradesh; Gurugram in Haryana; and Satna in Madhya Pradesh had also recorded all-time high temperatures for April at 46.8 degrees Celsius, 46.2 degrees Celsius, 45.1 degrees Celsius, 45.9 degrees Celsius and 45.3 degrees Celsius, respectively on Friday.

At 43.5 degrees Celsius, Delhi saw its highest maximum temperature for a day in April in 12 years on Thursday and Friday.

On Saturday, Delhi's Sports Complex weather station recorded a maximum temperature of 47.1 degrees Celsius.

Amid the intense heatwave, India's peak power demand reached an all-time high of 207.11 GW on Friday.

A heatwave is declared when the maximum temperature is over 40 degrees Celsius and at least 4.5 notches above normal. A severe heatwave is declared if the departure from normal temperature is more than 6.4 notches, according to .

Based on absolute recorded temperatures, a heatwave is declared when an area logs a maximum temperature of 45 degrees Celsius.

A severe heatwave is declared if the maximum temperature crosses the 47-degree Celsius mark.

India saw its warmest March this year since the began keeping records 122 years ago, amid a 71 per cent rain deficit.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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First Published: Tue, May 03 2022. 21:53 IST
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