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Why moon landings footage would have been impossible to fake in 1969
Business Standard

Reality or studio shoot? Why moon landing conspiracy theories still exist

In the US, opinion polls indicate that between 5-10% of Americans distrust the official version of events

Topics
moon | NASA | Apollo 50th Anniversary

Peter Knight | The Conversation 



nasa, moon
Astronaut Edwin E "Buzz" Aldrin Jr poses for a photograph beside the US flag deployed on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission on July 20, 1969. Photo: Nasa

Bill Kaysing was a former US Navy officer who worked as a technical writer for one of the rocket manufacturers for NASA’s Apollo missions. He claimed that he had inside knowledge of a government conspiracy to fake the landings, and many conspiracy theories about the Apollo landings which persist to this day can be traced back to his 1976 book, We Never Went to the Moon: America’s Thirty Billion Dollar Swindle.

The basic template of the conspiracy theory is that couldn’t manage to safely land a man on the moon by the end of the 1960s as President John F Kennedy had promised, so it only sent astronauts into Earth orbit. Conspiracy theorists then argue that staged the moon landings in a film studio and that there are tell-tale signs on the footage and the photos that give the game away. They claim that has covered up the elaborate hoax ever since.

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First Published: Thu, July 11 2019. 09:04 IST

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