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In a first, squirrel in Colorado tests positive for bubonic plague

A squirrel in Colorado has tested positive for the bubonic plague, a rare but serious bacterial infection that is transmitted by fleas

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Bubonic Plague

ANI 

Representative image
Representative image

In the first case of plague in the United States this year following the deadly coronavirus outbreak, a squirrel in Colorado has tested positive for the bubonic plague, a rare but serious bacterial infection that is transmitted by fleas.

The squirrel tested positive on July 11 in the town of Morrison, according to a news release from the Jefferson County Public Health (JCPH) department cited by CNN.

The disease has been around for centuries and is responsible for the deadliest pandemic in human history. An estimated 50 million people in Europe died during the Black Death pandemic of the Middle Ages.

Health officials warned the public that it can infect both humans and animals if proper precautions are not taken.

The disease can be transmitted from flea bites and infected animals. While modern antibiotics can prevent complications and death if treated quickly enough, it's still a major threat to both humans and animals.

The disease can cause painful, swollen lymph nodes. Fever, chills and coughing are also symptoms humans can experience.

On July 7, Chinese authorities confirmed a case of the in inner Mongolia. Local authorities in the town of Bayannur issued a citywide warning for plague prevention shortly after it was confirmed, which will remain in place for the rest of the year.

The plague has recently made a comeback, and the World Health Organization has categorized it as a re-emerging disease. There are approximately 1,000 to 2,000 cases every year, but that is likely a modest figure as there are a number of unreported cases, according to the WHO.

The United States reports up to a few dozen cases every year, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Two people died in Colorado from the plague in 2015.

If left untreated, the can turn into the pneumonic plague, which can cause pneumonia after bacteria spreads to the lungs.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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First Published: Wed, July 15 2020. 11:49 IST
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