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Clashes rock Bolivia as new interim leader challenged

AP  |  La Paz 

Renewed clashes have rocked Bolivia's capital as the country's newly declared interim president, a second-tier lawmaker thrust into the post because of a power vacuum, faced challenges to her leadership claim from supporters of ousted Evo Morales.

A day after Jeanine Anez claimed the presidency, violent clashes broke out between rock-throwing Morales' supporters and police in riot gear, who fired volleys of tear gas to disperse the large crowd of protesters.

Some demonstrators tore off corrugated sheets of metal and wooden planks from construction sites to use as weapons. Many had flooded the streets of the capital and its sister city of El Alto, a Morales stronghold, waving the multicolored indigenous flag and chanting, "Now, civil war!" "We don't want any dictators. This lady has stepped on us that's why we're so mad," said Paulina Luchampe.

"We're going to fight with our brothers and sisters until Evo Morales is back. We ask for his return. He needs to put the house in order."

Opposition was also building in Congress, where lawmakers loyal to Morales were mounting a challenge to Anez's legitimacy by trying to hold new sessions that would undermine the basis of her claim to the presidency. The sessions dismissed as invalid by Anez's faction added to the political uncertainty following the ouster of Morales, the nation's first indigenous leader, after nearly 14 years in power.

According to the constitution, an interim president has 90 days to organize an election, and the disputed accession of Aez, who until Tuesday was second-vice president of the Senate, was an example of the long list of obstacles she faces. Morales' backers, who hold a two-thirds majority in Congress, boycotted the session she called Tuesday night to formalize her claim to the presidency, preventing a quorum.

She took power anyway, saying the constitution did not specifically require congressional approval. "My commitment is to return democracy and tranquility to the country," she said. "They can never again steal our vote." Bolivia's top constitutional court issued a statement late Tuesday laying out the legal justification for Aez taking the presidency without mentioning her by name.

But other legal experts challenged the legal technicalities that led to her claim, saying at least some of the steps required Congress to meet.

And the lingering questions could affect her ability to govern.

Eduardo Gamarra, a Bolivian political scientist at Florida International University, said the constitution clearly states that Anez didn't need a congressional vote to assume the presidency. Even so, "the next two months are going to be extraordinarily difficult for President Anez," he said.

"It doesn't seem likely" that Morales' party "will accept her as president," said Jennifer Cyr, an associate professor of political science and Latin American studies at the University of Arizona.

"So the question of what happens next remains still quite unclear and extremely worrying." She will need to form a new electoral court, find non-partisan staff for the electoral tribunal and get Congress, which is controlled by Morales' Movement for Socialism Party, to vote on a new election.

Morales resigned Sunday following weeks of violent protests fed by allegations of electoral fraud in the October 20 election, which he claimed to have won. An Organization of American States audit reported widespread irregularities in the vote count and called for a new election.

But his decision came only after Gen. Williams Kaliman, the armed forces commander, urged him to step down "for the good of Bolivia" a move that Morales and his backers have branded a coup d'etat.

Anez swore in new commanders-in-chief in all branches of the military on Wednesday, replacing Kaliman, who had been a Morales loyalist, with Gen. Carlos Orellana. The move was seen as an effort to build an alliance with the military, although it was uncertain how much support she could count on from other Bolivian power centers.

Still, she received a boost of international support on Wednesday.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

First Published: Thu, November 14 2019. 04:40 IST
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