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School exposure to allergens linked to asthma symptoms

ANI  |  WashingtonD.C [US] 

A new study has found an association between school exposure to allergens and symptoms of asthma.

A new article by Wanda Phipatanakul, M.D., M.S., of Boston's Children's Hospital and Medical School, Boston, and co-authors examined that question in a study that included 284 students (ages 4 to 13) enrolled at 37 inner-city schools in the northeastern United States.

Classroom and home dust samples linked to the students were collected and analyzed for common indoor allergens, including rat, mouse, cockroach, cat, dog and dust mites. Associations between school exposure to allergens and asthma outcomes were adjusted for exposure to the allergens at home.

Mouse allergen was the most commonly detected allergen in schools and homes. Higher exposure to mouse allergen at school was associated with increased asthma symptoms and lower lung function, according to the results.

None of the other airborne allergens were associated with worse asthma outcomes. While cat and dog allergens were commonly detected in the schools, dust mite levels were low and cockroach and rat allergens were mostly undetectable in schools and homes.

Limitations of the study include that may not be generalisable to other cities where other allergens may be predominant in schools.

"These findings suggest that exposure reduction strategies in the school setting may effectively and efficiently benefit all children with asthma. Future school-based environmental intervention studies

may be warranted," the authors conclude..

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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School exposure to allergens linked to asthma symptoms

A new study has found an association between school exposure to allergens and symptoms of asthma.A new article by Wanda Phipatanakul, M.D., M.S., of Boston's Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, and co-authors examined that question in a study that included 284 students (ages 4 to 13) enrolled at 37 inner-city schools in the northeastern United States.Classroom and home dust samples linked to the students were collected and analyzed for common indoor allergens, including rat, mouse, cockroach, cat, dog and dust mites. Associations between school exposure to allergens and asthma outcomes were adjusted for exposure to the allergens at home.Mouse allergen was the most commonly detected allergen in schools and homes. Higher exposure to mouse allergen at school was associated with increased asthma symptoms and lower lung function, according to the results.None of the other airborne allergens were associated with worse asthma outcomes. While cat and dog allergens were ...

A new study has found an association between school exposure to allergens and symptoms of asthma.

A new article by Wanda Phipatanakul, M.D., M.S., of Boston's Children's Hospital and Medical School, Boston, and co-authors examined that question in a study that included 284 students (ages 4 to 13) enrolled at 37 inner-city schools in the northeastern United States.

Classroom and home dust samples linked to the students were collected and analyzed for common indoor allergens, including rat, mouse, cockroach, cat, dog and dust mites. Associations between school exposure to allergens and asthma outcomes were adjusted for exposure to the allergens at home.

Mouse allergen was the most commonly detected allergen in schools and homes. Higher exposure to mouse allergen at school was associated with increased asthma symptoms and lower lung function, according to the results.

None of the other airborne allergens were associated with worse asthma outcomes. While cat and dog allergens were commonly detected in the schools, dust mite levels were low and cockroach and rat allergens were mostly undetectable in schools and homes.

Limitations of the study include that may not be generalisable to other cities where other allergens may be predominant in schools.

"These findings suggest that exposure reduction strategies in the school setting may effectively and efficiently benefit all children with asthma. Future school-based environmental intervention studies

may be warranted," the authors conclude..

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

School exposure to allergens linked to asthma symptoms

A new study has found an association between school exposure to allergens and symptoms of asthma.

A new article by Wanda Phipatanakul, M.D., M.S., of Boston's Children's Hospital and Medical School, Boston, and co-authors examined that question in a study that included 284 students (ages 4 to 13) enrolled at 37 inner-city schools in the northeastern United States.

Classroom and home dust samples linked to the students were collected and analyzed for common indoor allergens, including rat, mouse, cockroach, cat, dog and dust mites. Associations between school exposure to allergens and asthma outcomes were adjusted for exposure to the allergens at home.

Mouse allergen was the most commonly detected allergen in schools and homes. Higher exposure to mouse allergen at school was associated with increased asthma symptoms and lower lung function, according to the results.

None of the other airborne allergens were associated with worse asthma outcomes. While cat and dog allergens were commonly detected in the schools, dust mite levels were low and cockroach and rat allergens were mostly undetectable in schools and homes.

Limitations of the study include that may not be generalisable to other cities where other allergens may be predominant in schools.

"These findings suggest that exposure reduction strategies in the school setting may effectively and efficiently benefit all children with asthma. Future school-based environmental intervention studies

may be warranted," the authors conclude..

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

image
Business Standard
177 22

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