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Climate change means more weather disasters every year, warns UN

The UN weather agency is warning that the number of people who need international humanitarian help could rise 50 per cent by 2030 compared to the 108 million who needed it worldwide in 2018

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Climate Change | United Nations

AP  |  Geneva 

climate change
Representative Photo

In the wake of heat waves, global warming, forest fires, storms, droughts and a rising number of hurricanes, the UN weather agency is warning that the number of people who need humanitarian help could rise 50 per cent by 2030 compared to the 108 million who needed it worldwide in 2018.

In a new report released with partners on Tuesday, the World Meteorological Agency says more disasters attributed to weather are taking place each year. It said over 11,000 disasters have been attributed to weather, climate and phenomena like tsunamis that are related to water over the last 50 years causing 2 million deaths and racking up USD 3.6 trillion worth of economic costs.

In one hopeful development over that period, the average number of deaths from each separate weather disaster per year has dropped by one-third, even as the number of such events and the economic costs from them have both surged.

The 2020 State of Climate Services report, compiled by 16 agencies and financing institutions, calls on governments to put more money into early-warning systems that can improve countries' ability to prepare for, respond to and mitigate the impact of such natural disasters.

"While COVID-19 generated a large health and economic crisis from which it will take years to recover, it is crucial to remember that will continue to pose an on-going and increasing threat to human lives, ecosystems, economies and societies for centuries to come," said WMO Secretary-General Petteri Taalas.

Recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic is an opportunity to move forward along a more sustainable path towards resilience and adaptation in the light of anthropogenic climate change, he said.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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First Published: Tue, October 13 2020. 14:43 IST
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