Egyptian photographer 'films his own death' during army firing

Dramatic video shot by a 26 year old photographer when a sniper shoots him dead

Footage has emerged which suggests a photographer captured his own death at the hands of Egyptian army on camera.

The 26-year-old photographer for Egypt's Al-Horia Wa Al-Adala newspaper was among at least 51 people killed when security forces opened fire on a large crowd.

The people were camping outside the Egyptian army's Republican Guard officers' club in Cairo, where ousted president Mohammed Morsi was believed to be in detention.

According to the Sydney Morning Herald, Ahmed Assem had been on the scene as the pro-Muslim Brotherhood protesters knelt for prayer shortly before dawn on Monday.

News of Assem's death filtered through after his bloodied camera and mobile phone were found at the site of the makeshift camp.

Ahmed Abu Zeid, the culture editor of Assem's newspaper, who was working from a facility set up next to the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque, said that a man came into the media centre with a camera covered in blood and said that one of our colleagues had been injured.

Zeid added that around and an hour later, he received news that Ahmed had been shot by a sniper in the forehead while filming or taking pictures on top of the buildings around the incident.

He said that Ahmed's camera was the only one which filmed the entire incident from the first moment, adding that the camera will remain a piece of evidence in the violations that have been committed, the report added.

Watch the Video

 

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Business Standard

Egyptian photographer 'films his own death' during army firing

Dramatic video shot by a 26 year old photographer when a sniper shoots him dead

ANI  |  Sydney 

Footage has emerged which suggests a photographer captured his own death at the hands of Egyptian army on camera.

The 26-year-old photographer for Egypt's Al-Horia Wa Al-Adala newspaper was among at least 51 people killed when security forces opened fire on a large crowd.

The people were camping outside the Egyptian army's Republican Guard officers' club in Cairo, where ousted president Mohammed Morsi was believed to be in detention.

According to the Sydney Morning Herald, Ahmed Assem had been on the scene as the pro-Muslim Brotherhood protesters knelt for prayer shortly before dawn on Monday.

News of Assem's death filtered through after his bloodied camera and mobile phone were found at the site of the makeshift camp.

Ahmed Abu Zeid, the culture editor of Assem's newspaper, who was working from a facility set up next to the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque, said that a man came into the media centre with a camera covered in blood and said that one of our colleagues had been injured.

Zeid added that around and an hour later, he received news that Ahmed had been shot by a sniper in the forehead while filming or taking pictures on top of the buildings around the incident.

He said that Ahmed's camera was the only one which filmed the entire incident from the first moment, adding that the camera will remain a piece of evidence in the violations that have been committed, the report added.

Watch the Video



 

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Egyptian photographer 'films his own death' during army firing

Dramatic video shot by a 26 year old photographer when a sniper shoots him dead

Footage has emerged which suggests a photographer captured his own death at the hands of Egyptian army on camera.The 26-year-old photographer for Egypt's Al-Horia Wa Al-Adala newspaper was among at least 51 people killed when security forces opened fire on a large crowd.The people were camping outside the Egyptian army's Republican Guard officers' club in Cairo, where ousted president Mohammed Morsi was believed to be in detention.According to the Sydney Morning Herald, Ahmed Assem had been on the scene as the pro-Muslim Brotherhood protesters knelt for prayer shortly before dawn on Monday.News of Assem's death filtered through after his bloodied camera and mobile phone were found at the site of the makeshift camp.Ahmed Abu Zeid, the culture editor of Assem's newspaper, who was working from a facility set up next to the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque, said that a man came into the media centre with a camera covered in blood and said that one of our colleagues had been injured.Zeid added that

Footage has emerged which suggests a photographer captured his own death at the hands of Egyptian army on camera.

The 26-year-old photographer for Egypt's Al-Horia Wa Al-Adala newspaper was among at least 51 people killed when security forces opened fire on a large crowd.

The people were camping outside the Egyptian army's Republican Guard officers' club in Cairo, where ousted president Mohammed Morsi was believed to be in detention.

According to the Sydney Morning Herald, Ahmed Assem had been on the scene as the pro-Muslim Brotherhood protesters knelt for prayer shortly before dawn on Monday.

News of Assem's death filtered through after his bloodied camera and mobile phone were found at the site of the makeshift camp.

Ahmed Abu Zeid, the culture editor of Assem's newspaper, who was working from a facility set up next to the Rabaa al-Adawiya mosque, said that a man came into the media centre with a camera covered in blood and said that one of our colleagues had been injured.

Zeid added that around and an hour later, he received news that Ahmed had been shot by a sniper in the forehead while filming or taking pictures on top of the buildings around the incident.

He said that Ahmed's camera was the only one which filmed the entire incident from the first moment, adding that the camera will remain a piece of evidence in the violations that have been committed, the report added.

Watch the Video

 

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Business Standard
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