Cattle may be source of MRSA in humans

A strain of bacteria that causes skin and soft tissue infections in humans originally came from cattle, a new study claims.

Researchers who conducted the genetic analysis of strains of Staphylococcus aureus known as CC97 say these strains developed resistance to methicillin after they crossed over into humans around 40 years ago.

Methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) strain CC97 is an emerging human pathogen in Europe, North and South America, Africa, and Asia, researchers said.

The findings highlight the potential for cows to serve as a reservoir for bacteria with the capacity for pandemic spread in humans, they said.

The researchers sequenced the genomes of 43 different CC97 isolates from humans, cattle, and other animals, and plotted their genetic relationships in a phylogenetic tree.

Ross Fitzgerald of the Roslin Institute and the in said strains of CC97 found in cows appear to be the ancestors of CC97 strains from humans.

"Bovine strains seemed to occupy deeper parts of the phylogenetic tree - they were closer to the root than the human strains. This led us to conclude that the strains infecting humans originated in cows and that they had evolved from bovine to human host jumps," said Fitzgerald.

Although the CC97 strains from animals were quite genetically diverse, the human isolates cluster together in two tight, distinct "clades," or relatedness groups, indicating that S aureus CC97 in cattle crossed over into humans on two separate occasions.

Using mutation rates as a molecular clock, the authors determined that the ancestor of clade A jumped from a bovine host to humans between 1894 and 1977 and clade B made the jump between 1938 and 1966.

After they made the jump, the human CC97 strains acquired some new capabilities, says Fitzgerald, thanks to genes encoded on portable pieces of DNA called mobile genetic elements.

"It seems like these elements, such as pathogenicity islands, phages, and plasmids, are important in order for the bacterium to adapt to different host species," said Fitzgerald.

Perhaps the most problematic new capability the human strains acquired is the ability to resist methicillin, an important antibiotic for fighting staphylococcal infections.

Only human strains of CC97 were able to resist the drug, which indicates that the bacteria acquired resistance after they crossed over into humans, presumably through exposure to antibiotics prescribed for treating human infections.

The study is published in the journal mBio.

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Cattle may be source of MRSA in humans

Press Trust of India  |  Washington 



A strain of bacteria that causes skin and soft tissue infections in humans originally came from cattle, a new study claims.

Researchers who conducted the genetic analysis of strains of Staphylococcus aureus known as CC97 say these strains developed resistance to methicillin after they crossed over into humans around 40 years ago.



Methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) strain CC97 is an emerging human pathogen in Europe, North and South America, Africa, and Asia, researchers said.

The findings highlight the potential for cows to serve as a reservoir for bacteria with the capacity for pandemic spread in humans, they said.

The researchers sequenced the genomes of 43 different CC97 isolates from humans, cattle, and other animals, and plotted their genetic relationships in a phylogenetic tree.

Ross Fitzgerald of the Roslin Institute and the in said strains of CC97 found in cows appear to be the ancestors of CC97 strains from humans.

"Bovine strains seemed to occupy deeper parts of the phylogenetic tree - they were closer to the root than the human strains. This led us to conclude that the strains infecting humans originated in cows and that they had evolved from bovine to human host jumps," said Fitzgerald.

Although the CC97 strains from animals were quite genetically diverse, the human isolates cluster together in two tight, distinct "clades," or relatedness groups, indicating that S aureus CC97 in cattle crossed over into humans on two separate occasions.

Using mutation rates as a molecular clock, the authors determined that the ancestor of clade A jumped from a bovine host to humans between 1894 and 1977 and clade B made the jump between 1938 and 1966.

After they made the jump, the human CC97 strains acquired some new capabilities, says Fitzgerald, thanks to genes encoded on portable pieces of DNA called mobile genetic elements.

"It seems like these elements, such as pathogenicity islands, phages, and plasmids, are important in order for the bacterium to adapt to different host species," said Fitzgerald.

Perhaps the most problematic new capability the human strains acquired is the ability to resist methicillin, an important antibiotic for fighting staphylococcal infections.

Only human strains of CC97 were able to resist the drug, which indicates that the bacteria acquired resistance after they crossed over into humans, presumably through exposure to antibiotics prescribed for treating human infections.

The study is published in the journal mBio.

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Cattle may be source of MRSA in humans

A strain of bacteria that causes skin and soft tissue infections in humans originally came from cattle, a new study claims. Researchers who conducted the genetic analysis of strains of Staphylococcus aureus known as CC97 say these strains developed resistance to methicillin after they crossed over into humans around 40 years ago. Methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) strain CC97 is an emerging human pathogen in Europe, North and South America, Africa, and Asia, researchers said. The findings highlight the potential for cows to serve as a reservoir for bacteria with the capacity for pandemic spread in humans, they said. The researchers sequenced the genomes of 43 different CC97 isolates from humans, cattle, and other animals, and plotted their genetic relationships in a phylogenetic tree. Ross Fitzgerald of the Roslin Institute and the University of Edinburgh in Scotland said strains of CC97 found in cows appear to be the ancestors of CC97 strains from humans. "Bovine strains ... A strain of bacteria that causes skin and soft tissue infections in humans originally came from cattle, a new study claims.

Researchers who conducted the genetic analysis of strains of Staphylococcus aureus known as CC97 say these strains developed resistance to methicillin after they crossed over into humans around 40 years ago.

Methicillin-resistant S aureus (MRSA) strain CC97 is an emerging human pathogen in Europe, North and South America, Africa, and Asia, researchers said.

The findings highlight the potential for cows to serve as a reservoir for bacteria with the capacity for pandemic spread in humans, they said.

The researchers sequenced the genomes of 43 different CC97 isolates from humans, cattle, and other animals, and plotted their genetic relationships in a phylogenetic tree.

Ross Fitzgerald of the Roslin Institute and the in said strains of CC97 found in cows appear to be the ancestors of CC97 strains from humans.

"Bovine strains seemed to occupy deeper parts of the phylogenetic tree - they were closer to the root than the human strains. This led us to conclude that the strains infecting humans originated in cows and that they had evolved from bovine to human host jumps," said Fitzgerald.

Although the CC97 strains from animals were quite genetically diverse, the human isolates cluster together in two tight, distinct "clades," or relatedness groups, indicating that S aureus CC97 in cattle crossed over into humans on two separate occasions.

Using mutation rates as a molecular clock, the authors determined that the ancestor of clade A jumped from a bovine host to humans between 1894 and 1977 and clade B made the jump between 1938 and 1966.

After they made the jump, the human CC97 strains acquired some new capabilities, says Fitzgerald, thanks to genes encoded on portable pieces of DNA called mobile genetic elements.

"It seems like these elements, such as pathogenicity islands, phages, and plasmids, are important in order for the bacterium to adapt to different host species," said Fitzgerald.

Perhaps the most problematic new capability the human strains acquired is the ability to resist methicillin, an important antibiotic for fighting staphylococcal infections.

Only human strains of CC97 were able to resist the drug, which indicates that the bacteria acquired resistance after they crossed over into humans, presumably through exposure to antibiotics prescribed for treating human infections.

The study is published in the journal mBio.
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