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Even Zuckerberg has been a victim of cybersecurity: How to avoid getting hacked

The hackers gained entry through a completely different app that I hadn't used in years, reports Tech in Asia

Ryan Holmes 

I run a technology company, still got hacked: lessons on cyber security for executives

“Hey, it’s OurMine Team, we are just testing your security, please send us a message.”

Earlier this summer, that message was blasted out to my followers on Twitter… only I didn’t send it.

I had been hacked. I run a technology company — in fact, it’s a management company that prides itself on world-class security for our customers.

For other professionals and executives out there on social media, here’s a rundown of what went wrong in some recent high-profile hacks and how you can keep your own accounts safe.

Beware of the side door

Here’s where I got tripped up. The hackers who breached my account actually gained entry through a completely different app that I hadn’t used in years. 

Pump up your passwords

I can see your eyes glazing over. But strong passwords — the kind with lots of random numbers and symbols — actually do matter. 

Sharing isn’t caring

But even a strong won’t do you any good if you share it around.

Two-factor is a no-brainer

After my hacking incident, I did something I should have done a long time ago: I enabled two-factor authentication on my account. 

Careful where you click

Newer phishing scams can be hard to detect and easy to fall victim to. On — where phishing is up 150% this year — avoid clicking links from unfamiliar users.

Have someone (or something) at the helm

I run a technology company, still got hacked: lessons on cyber security for executives
My hackers struck late on a Saturday night and that was likely no accident. 
When you’re hacked, time is of the essence

Getting hacked is bad enough. But getting hacked and not responding swiftly makes the situation exponentially worse. 


This is an excerpt from Tech in Asia. You can read the full article here

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Even Zuckerberg has been a victim of cybersecurity: How to avoid getting hacked

The hackers gained entry through a completely different app that I hadn't used in years, reports Tech in Asia

The hackers gained entry through a completely different app that I hadn't used in years, reports Tech in Asia
“Hey, it’s OurMine Team, we are just testing your security, please send us a message.”

Earlier this summer, that message was blasted out to my followers on Twitter… only I didn’t send it.

I had been hacked. I run a technology company — in fact, it’s a management company that prides itself on world-class security for our customers.

For other professionals and executives out there on social media, here’s a rundown of what went wrong in some recent high-profile hacks and how you can keep your own accounts safe.

Beware of the side door

Here’s where I got tripped up. The hackers who breached my account actually gained entry through a completely different app that I hadn’t used in years. 

Pump up your passwords

I can see your eyes glazing over. But strong passwords — the kind with lots of random numbers and symbols — actually do matter. 

Sharing isn’t caring

But even a strong won’t do you any good if you share it around.

Two-factor is a no-brainer

After my hacking incident, I did something I should have done a long time ago: I enabled two-factor authentication on my account. 

Careful where you click

Newer phishing scams can be hard to detect and easy to fall victim to. On — where phishing is up 150% this year — avoid clicking links from unfamiliar users.

Have someone (or something) at the helm

I run a technology company, still got hacked: lessons on cyber security for executives
My hackers struck late on a Saturday night and that was likely no accident. 
When you’re hacked, time is of the essence

Getting hacked is bad enough. But getting hacked and not responding swiftly makes the situation exponentially worse. 


This is an excerpt from Tech in Asia. You can read the full article here

image
Business Standard
177 22

Even Zuckerberg has been a victim of cybersecurity: How to avoid getting hacked

The hackers gained entry through a completely different app that I hadn't used in years, reports Tech in Asia

“Hey, it’s OurMine Team, we are just testing your security, please send us a message.”

Earlier this summer, that message was blasted out to my followers on Twitter… only I didn’t send it.

I had been hacked. I run a technology company — in fact, it’s a management company that prides itself on world-class security for our customers.

For other professionals and executives out there on social media, here’s a rundown of what went wrong in some recent high-profile hacks and how you can keep your own accounts safe.

Beware of the side door

Here’s where I got tripped up. The hackers who breached my account actually gained entry through a completely different app that I hadn’t used in years. 

Pump up your passwords

I can see your eyes glazing over. But strong passwords — the kind with lots of random numbers and symbols — actually do matter. 

Sharing isn’t caring

But even a strong won’t do you any good if you share it around.

Two-factor is a no-brainer

After my hacking incident, I did something I should have done a long time ago: I enabled two-factor authentication on my account. 

Careful where you click

Newer phishing scams can be hard to detect and easy to fall victim to. On — where phishing is up 150% this year — avoid clicking links from unfamiliar users.

Have someone (or something) at the helm

I run a technology company, still got hacked: lessons on cyber security for executives
My hackers struck late on a Saturday night and that was likely no accident. 
When you’re hacked, time is of the essence

Getting hacked is bad enough. But getting hacked and not responding swiftly makes the situation exponentially worse. 


This is an excerpt from Tech in Asia. You can read the full article here

image
Business Standard
177 22

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