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Archbishop Desmond Tutu's funeral set for January 1: Foundation

The funeral of Desmond Mpilo Tutu, South African Anglican archbishop, human rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize winner will take place on January 1 in Cape Town, his foundation has announced.

Topics
South Africa | apartheid | Racism

ANI 

Anglican Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu
Anglican Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu, speaks during an interview with the Associated Press in Pretoria, South Africa, Friday, March 21, 2003. Tutu has died at age 90. Bloomberg

The funeral of Desmond Mpilo Tutu, South African Anglican archbishop, human rights activist and Nobel Peace Prize winner will take place on January 1 in Cape Town, his foundation has announced.

"Arrangements for a week of mourning are still in their infancy," the foundation said in a Sunday statement, as quoted by the French RFI radio station, adding that the week of mourning will end with "the funeral of the Archbishop in Cape Town on Saturday, January 1, 2022."

Tutu passed away on Sunday at the age of 90, in Cape Town, according to South African President Cyril Ramaphosa who said that the activist's death "is another chapter of bereavement in our nation's farewell to a generation of outstanding South Africans."

Pope Francis and the Dalai Lama have both expressed condolences over Tutu's death. UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres said that he was "deeply saddened" by the passing of the "towering global figure for peace and justice."

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson said that Tutu will be remembered for his "spiritual leadership and irrepressible good humour." US President Joe Biden and First Lady Jill Biden also expressed "deepest condolences" saying they were "heartbroken" after learning of Tutu's passing.

Tutu is widely known for his staunch opposition to apartheid, which resulted in him receiving a Nobel Prize in 1984, but he has spoken out on many other causes as well. The archbishop also served as the chairman of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission after the abolition of and is known for coining the term "Rainbow Nation" to describe post- .

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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First Published: Mon, December 27 2021. 11:07 IST
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