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Senators to hear opening arguments as Donald Trump fumes over trial

Opening arguments will begin Wednesday in Donald Trump's impeachment trial after an emotional first day that wrenched senators and the nation back to the deadly January 6 attack on the US Capitol.

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Donald Trump | US Senate

AP  |  Washington 

Donald Trump
Donald Trump

Opening arguments will begin Wednesday in Donald Trump's impeachment trial after an emotional first day that wrenched senators and the nation back to the deadly January 6 attack on the US Capitol.

Trump's attorneys sought to halt the trial on constitutional grounds, but lost that bid on Tuesday. Their arguments were meandering at times, leaving Trump fuming over his lawyers' performance and allies questioning the defense strategy. Some called for yet another shakeup to his legal team.

House Democratic prosecutors are seeking to link Trump directly to the riot that left five people dead, replaying graphic video of the rioters ransacking the building to try to stop the certification of Democrat Joe Biden's victory and Trump's statements urging them to fight the election results.

Senators, many of whom fled for safety the day of the attack, watched graphic videos of the assault by Trump supporters who battled past police to storm the halls, Trump flags waving. More video is expected Wednesday, including some that hasn't been seen before.

Trump is the first president to face impeachment trial after leaving office and the first to be twice impeached. While many minds are made up, the senators will face their own moment to decide whether to convict or acquit Trump of the sole charge of incitement of insurrection.

That's a high crime and misdemeanor, Rep. Jamie Raskin, D-Md., declared in opening remarks. If that's not an impeachable offense, then there's no such thing.

Trump's lawyers insist he is not guilty, his fiery words just figures of speech.

Security remained extremely tight at the Capitol, a changed place after the attack, fenced off with razor wire and with armed National Guard troops on patrol. The nine House managers walked across the shuttered building to prosecute the case before the Senate.

White House press secretary Jen Psaki said Biden would not be watching the trial of his predecessor.

Joe Biden is the president, he's not a pundit, he's not going to opine on back and forth arguments, she said.

With senators sworn to deliver impartial justice, the trial started with the Democratic House managers' gripping recollections, as they described police officers maimed in the chaos and rioters parading in the very chamber where the trial was being held.

Trump's team countered that the Constitution doesn't allow impeachment at this late date. Though the trial now proceeds, that's a legal issue that could resonate with Republicans eager to acquit Trump without being seen as condoning his behavior.

Lead defense lawyer Bruce Castor said he shifted his planned approach after hearing the prosecutors' opening and instead spoke conversationally to the senators, saying Trump's team would do nothing but denounce the repugnant attack and in the strongest possible way denounce the rioters.

He appealed to the senators as patriots first, and encouraged them to be cool headed as they assess the arguments.

Trump attorney David Schoen turned the trial toward starkly partisan tones, saying the Democrats were fueled by a base hatred of the former president.

The early defense struggles also underscored the uphill battle that Trump's lawyers face in defending conduct that preceded an insurrection that senators themselves personally experienced. Though they will almost certainly win Trump's acquittal by virtue of the composition of the Senate they nonetheless face a challenge of defanging the emotion from a trial centered on events that remain raw and visceral, even for Republicans.

Republicans made it clear that they were unhappy with Trump's defense, many of them saying they didn't understand where it was going particularly Castor's opening. Louisiana Sen. Bill Cassidy, who voted with Democrats to move forward with the trial, said that Trump's team did a terrible job. Maine Sen. Susan Collins, who also voted with Democrats, said she was perplexed. Sen. Lisa Murkowki of Alaska said it was a missed opportunity for the defense.

While the 56-44 vote affirmed the Senate's authority under the Constitution to decide the case even after the president had left office, the total was still far from the two-thirds threshold of 67 votes that would be needed for conviction.

The six Republicans who joined with Democrats to pursue the trial was one more than on a similar vote last week. Cassidy joined Collins, Murkowski, Mitt Romney of Utah, Ben Sasse of Nebraska and Pat Toomey of Pennsylvania.

At one pivotal point, Raskin told his personal story of bringing his family to the Capitol that day to witness the certification of the Electoral College vote, only to have his daughter and son-in-law hiding in an office, fearing for their lives.

Senators, this cannot be our future, Raskin said through tears. This cannot be the future of America.

The House prosecutors had argued there is no January exception for a president to avoid impeachment on his way out the door.

Rep. Joe Neguse, D-Colo., referred to the corruption case of William Belknap, a war secretary in the Grant administration, who was impeached, tried and ultimately acquitted by the Senate after leaving office.

If Congress stands by, it would invite future presidents to use their power without any fear of accountability," he said.

It appears unlikely that the House prosecutors will call witnesses, and Trump has declined a request to testify.

The trial is expected to continue into the weekend.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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First Published: Wed, February 10 2021. 21:21 IST
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