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UN adopts $3.2 billion budget for 2021 over US and Israel objections

UN members have adopted a budget for 2021 that was higher than Secretary-General Guterres proposed and was strongly opposed by the Trump administration

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United Nations | US | israel

AP  |  United Nations 

United Nations building in New York
United Nations building in New York

After down-to-the-wire negotiations, members have adopted a budget for 2021 that was higher than Secretary-General Antonio Guterres proposed and was strongly opposed by the Trump administration for including money to commemorate the outcome of a 2001 conference in South Africa that it called anti-Semitic and anti-

The UN's regular operating budget is usually approved by consensus before Christmas, but this year contentious negotiations kept diplomats sparring until New Years Eve.

While many countries that had compromised on a variety of issues thought consensus had been achieved, the United States called for a vote over funding to commemorate the Durban Declaration and Program of Action adopted at the World Conference Against Racism.

The USD 3.231 billion budget was then approved by the UN General Assembly last Thursday by a vote of 167-2 with the United States and voting no.

Ambassador Kelly Craft accused the world body of extending a shameful legacy of hate, anti-Semitism, and anti-bias by supporting an official event during the next General Assembly session, which starts in September, commemorating the Durban outcome.

The Durban conference was dominated by clashes over the Middle East and the legacy of slavery, and the and Israel walked out during the meeting over a draft resolution that singled out Israel for criticism and likened Zionism to racism. That language was dropped in the final documents.

Craft said it was ironic that while the General Assembly was eagerly endorsing two decades of dishonesty and division, the Trump administration was bringing Israel and Arab nations, including the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain, together and bridging age-old divides between people.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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First Published: Tue, January 05 2021. 07:22 IST
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