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NASA's Mars Opportunity rover 'declared dead'

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The NASA has officially called time on its rover, after the six-wheeled robot landed on the Red Planet 15 years ago for searching life on it.

The stopped communicating with Earth when a severe Mars-wide dust storm blanketed its location in June 2018. After more than a thousand commands to restore contact, engineers in the at (JPL) made their last attempt to revive on Tuesday, but to no avail. The solar-powered rover's final communication was received on June 10 last year.

"It is because of trailblazing missions such as Opportunity that there will come a day when our brave astronauts walk on the surface of Mars," said NASA in a statement.

"And when that day arrives, some portion of that first footprint will be owned by the men and women of Opportunity, and a little that defied the odds and did so much in the name of exploration," he added.

Designed to last just 90 Martian days and travel 1,100 yards (1,000 meters), Opportunity vastly surpassed all expectations in its endurance, scientific value and longevity. In addition to exceeding its life expectancy by 60 times, the travelled more than 28 miles (45 kilometres) by the time it reached its most appropriate final resting spot on -

"For more than a decade, Opportunity has been an icon in the field of planetary exploration, teaching us about Mars' ancient past as a wet, potentially habitable planet, and revealing uncharted Martian landscapes," said Thomas Zurbuchen, for

"Whatever loss we feel now must be tempered with the knowledge that the legacy of Opportunity continues - both on the surface of with the Curiosity rover and lander - and in the clean rooms of JPL, where the upcoming Mars 2020 rover is taking shape," he added.

The final transmission, sent via the 70-meter Mars Station antenna at NASA's Deep Space Complex in California, ended a multifaceted, eight-month recovery strategy in an attempt to compel the rover to communicate, as per the statement.

"We have made every reasonable engineering effort to try to recover Opportunity and have determined that the likelihood of receiving a signal is far too low to continue recovery efforts," said John Callas, manager of the (MER) project at JPL.

Opportunity landed in the Meridiani Planum region of Mars on January 24, 2004, seven months after its launch from in Its twin rover, Spirit, landed 20 days earlier in the 103-mile-wide (166-kilometer-wide) on the other side of Mars. Spirit logged almost 5 miles (8 kilometres) before its mission wrapped up in May 2011.

From the day Opportunity landed, a team of mission engineers, rover drivers and scientists on Earth collaborated to overcome challenges and get the rover from one on Mars to the next. They plotted workable avenues over rugged terrain so that the 384-pound (174-kilogram) Martian explorer could manoeuvre around and, at times, over rocks and boulders, climb gravel-strewn slopes as steep as 32-degrees (an off-Earth record), probe crater floors, summit hills and traverse possible dry riverbeds. Its final venture brought it to the western limb of

"I cannot think of a more appropriate place for Opportunity to endure on the surface of Mars than one called Perseverance Valley," Michael Watkins, of JPL, was quoted as saying in the statement.

"The records, discoveries and sheer tenacity of this intrepid little rover is a testament to the ingenuity, dedication, and perseverance of the people who built and guided her," he added.

In 2005 alone, Opportunity lost steering to one of its front wheels, a stuck heater threatened to severely limit the rover's available power, and a Martian sand ripple almost trapped it for good. Two years later, a two-month dust storm imperilled the rover before relenting. In 2015, Opportunity lost use of its 256-megabyte and, in 2017, it lost steering to its other front wheel.

Each time the rover faced an obstacle, Opportunity's team on Earth found and implemented a solution that enabled the rover to bounce back. However, the massive dust storm that took shape in the summer of 2018 proved too much for history's most senior Mars explorer, according to the statement.

Mars exploration continues unabated. NASA's lander, which touched down on Nov. 26, is just beginning its scientific investigations.

The Curiosity rover has been exploring for more than six years. And, NASA's Mars 2020 rover and the European Space Agency's ExoMars rover both will launch in July 2020, becoming the first rover missions designed to seek signs of past microbial life on the Red Planet.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

First Published: Thu, February 14 2019. 07:17 IST
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