You are here: Home » News-IANS » Sports
Business Standard

India, New Zealand share spoils after another washout

Topics
Sports

IANS  |  Nottingham 

The India-New Zealand match was abandoned here on Thursday without a bowl being bowled - the fourth such instance in this World Cup - with both teams sharing a point each.

Rain had been forecast for this game and repeated inspections of the ground afterwards did not bear any fruit.

The no result meant New Zealand (7 points) stay on top while India (5 points) edge ahead of England (4 points) to the third spot with Australia (6 points) staying second.

The Kiwis are yet to lose a game with three wins before this, while Virat Kohli and Co. have beaten South Africa and Australia to start their campaign on a high.

With opener Shikhar Dhawan ruled out for at least three weeks, it would have been K.L. Rahul's first time as Rohit Sharma's opening partner in ODI cricket. As there was no toss, it could not be ascertained as to who the team picked for the No. 4 slot with both allrounder Vijay Shankar and seasond stumper-batsman Dinesh Karthik available.

So far, the South Africa-West Indies, Sri Lanka-Pakistan and Sri Lanka-Bangladesh games have all been washouts.

The ICC has said in a statement that it will be a logistical mayhem to keep reserve days for games in the group stage.

"Factoring in a reserve day for every match at the World Cup would significantly increase the length of the tournament and practically would be extremely complex to deliver," ICC Chief Executive David Richardson had said in a statement a few days back.

"It would impact pitch preparation, team recovery and travel days, accommodation and venue availability, tournament staffing, volunteer and match officials' availability, broadcast logistics and very importantly, the spectators who in some instances travel hours to be at the game. There is also no guarantee that the reserve day would be free from rain either.

"Up to 1,200 people are on site to deliver a match and everything associated with it, including getting it broadcast, and a proportion of them are moving around the country. So reserve days in the group stages would require a significant uplift in the number of staff," he added.

--IANS

dm/kk/vd

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Dear Reader,


Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.
We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

First Published: Thu, June 13 2019. 20:08 IST
RECOMMENDED FOR YOU
RECOMMENDED FOR YOU