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China birth rate lowest in 2019 since 1949 as workforce continues to shrink

To avoid a demographic crisis, the government relaxed its one-child policy in 2016 to allow people to have two children, but the change has not resulted in more pregnancies

Topics
China population | China economic growth | Chinese economy

AFP | PTI  |  Beijing 

A float featuring China’s national emblem travels past Tiananmen Gate during the parade celebrating 70 years of Communist party rule in Beijing. Photo: Reuters
A float featuring China’s national emblem travels past Tiananmen Gate during the parade celebrating 70 years of Communist party rule in Beijing. Photo: Reuters

China's dropped last year to its lowest level since the Communist country was founded in 1949, adding to concerns that an ageing society and shrinking workforce will pile pressure on a slowing

To avoid a demographic crisis, the government relaxed its one-child policy in 2016 to allow people to have two children, but the change has not resulted in more pregnancies.

In 2019, the stood at 10.48 per 1,000 people, according to data from the National Bureau of Statistics (NBS) released on Friday.

The number of births has now fallen for three consecutive years. There were 14.65 million babies born in 2019, after 15.23 million in 2018 and 17.23 million in 2017.

Still, China's population stood at 1.4 billion by the end of 2019, increasing by 4.67 million from the year before.

China's workforce continued to shrink last year.

The NBS said there were 896.4 million people aged between 16 and 59 -- its population of working age -- a drop from the 897.3 million in 2018.

This marks the eighth consecutive year of decline, and the workforce is expected to decline by as much as 23 percent by 2050.

Although China's limit on family sizes could be removed, the rising cost of living has discouraged many of child-bearing age to have bigger families.

China's grew by 6.1 percent in 2019, its slowest pace since 1990 as it was hit by weaker demand and a bruising trade war with the United States.

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First Published: Fri, January 17 2020. 12:15 IST
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