You are here: Home » PTI Stories » National » News
Business Standard

US to establish lab network for combating 'superbugs'

AFP  |  Washington 

US authorities have said they are establishing a network of labs that can respond quickly to antibiotic-resistant "superbugs", following America's first human case of a dangerous strain of E. Coli.

The announcement by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention came yesterday as authorities try to identify people who had contact with a 49-year-old woman in the eastern state of Pennsylvania whose urinary tract infection tested positive for E. Coli bacteria carrying the antibiotic-resistant mcr-1 gene.

Starting in the fall, the CDC will provide infrastructure and lab capacity for "seven to eight regional labs, and labs in all states and seven major cities/territories, to detect and respond to resistant organisms recovered from human samples," the agency said in a statement.

State labs will be able to detect changes in antibiotic resistance and report the findings to federal authorities, leading to faster and more effective investigations and "stronger infection control among patients to prevent and combat future resistance threats."

The Pennsylvania woman had not travelled abroad recently and officials do not know how she contracted the bacteria with the antibiotic-resistant gene previously found in China and Europe.

The mcr-1 gene makes bacteria resistant to the drug colistin, which is used as an antibiotic of last resort.

Colistin has been available since 1959 to treat infections but was abandoned for human use in the 1980s due to high kidney toxicity.

It is widely used in livestock farming, especially in China.

However, colistin has been brought back as a treatment of last resort in hospitals and clinics as bacteria have started developing resistance to other, more modern drugs.

The CDC said an investigation has determined that the Pennsylvania patient did not have a type of bacteria known as carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae (CRE) and it was not resistant to all antibiotics.

"The presence of the mcr-1 gene, however, and its ability to share its colistin resistance with other bacteria such as CRE raise the risk that pan-resistant bacteria could develop," the CDC said.

US health authorities have been looking for the mcr-1 gene in the US since it emerged in China in 2015.

Its discovery in the United States for the first time "heralds the emergence of truly pan-drug resistant bacteria," said a Defense Department report on the finding published last week in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology.

Dear Reader,


Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.
We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

First Published: Wed, June 01 2016. 17:48 IST
RECOMMENDED FOR YOU