You are here: Home » Technology » News » Computers
Business Standard

Soon, glass windows can turn into TV screen

By coating small pieces of glass with extremely thin layers of metal like silver makes it possible to enhance the amount of light coming through the glass

Topics
Glass Technology

Press Trust of India  |  Toronto 

Touch screen image via Shutterstock.com
Touch screen image via

Imagine a window in your living room that could double as a giant thermostat or a big TV screen. A new may make it possible.

Researchers at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in Canada have found that coating small pieces of glass with extremely thin layers of metal like silver makes it possible to enhance the amount of light coming through the glass.

This, coupled with the fact that metals naturally conduct electricity, may make it possible to add advanced technologies to windowpanes and other glass objects, researchers said.

"Engineers are constantly trying to expand the scope of materials that they can use for display technologies, and having thin, inexpensive, see-through components that conduct electricity will be huge," said UBC Associate Professor and lead investigator Kenneth Chau.

"I think one of the most important implications of this research is the potential to integrate electronic capabilities into windows and make them smart," said Chau.

The next phase of this research, added Chau, will be to incorporate their invention onto windows with an aim to selectively filter light and heat waves depending on the season or time of day.

The theory underlying the research was developed by Chau and collaborator Loic Markley, an assistant professor of engineering at UBC.

Chau and Markley questioned what would happen if they reversed the practice of applying glass over metal - a typical method used in the creation of energy efficient window coatings.

"It's been known for quite a while that you could put glass on metal to make metal more transparent, but people have never put metal on top of glass to make glass more transparent," said Markley.

"It's counter-intuitive to think that metal could be used to enhance light transmission, but we saw that this was actually possible, and our experiments are the first to prove it," Markley added.

The research was published in the journal Scientific Reports.

Dear Reader,


Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.
We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

First Published: Mon, February 22 2016. 16:02 IST
RECOMMENDED FOR YOU
RECOMMENDED FOR YOU