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Apple patent case: Qualcomm CEO expects 'out of court' settlement

These things tend to get resolved out of court: Qualcomm CEO Steve Mollenkopf

IANS  |  San Francisco 

Apple, iPhone, iPad
Photo: Reuters

Global chip maker that recently filed a new patent infringement lawsuit against now expects 'out of court' settlement with the Cupertino-based iPhone maker.

According to a Fortune report on Tuesday, CEO Steve Mollenkopf said during the Brainstorm Tech conference in Aspen, Colorado, that "those things tend to get resolved out of court and there's no reason why I wouldn't expect that to be the case here."

He was comparing the dispute with to earlier fights has had with other tech companies that were settled out of court.

Mollenkopf, however, added he didn't have any specific news announcing a settlement was on the way.

"I don't have an announcement or anything so please don't ask," he told the gathering.

Earlier in July, asked the US authorities to ban imports of some iPhone and iPad models.

filed a complaint with the US Trade Commission, accusing Apple's iPhones and iPads of infringing six of its mobile patents.

said all iPhones and iPads that contain competing mobile communications chips should be barred from the country.

responded to this, saying that the company had tried to negotiate before suing and that is abusing its position.

In April, stopped paying royalties to contract manufacturers for phone patents owned by over an "unresolved issue".

reportedly stopped paying royalties starting with devices sold during the March quarter.

is one of the world's biggest provider of mobile chips and derives revenue majorly from licensing that to hundreds of handset manufacturers and others.

The US chip manufacturer had lambasted for breaching deals between the two companies and urged that the lawsuit filed in January against them by the iPhone maker should be rejected.

also accused of harming its business and sought unspecified damages.

sued in January for nearly one billion dollars over royalties, with the Cupertino-based tech giant alleging the wireless chipmaker that it did not give fair licensing terms for its processor

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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