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Singapore waives levies on foreign workers during stay-home period

Singapore said it would waive levies on foreign workers during their stay-home notice periods from January to September to help employers manage the increased costs associated with the Covid-19 safety

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Singapore | Work from home

Press Trust of India  |  Singapore 

Singapore
Singapore

on Thursday said it would waive levies on foreign workers, including maids, during their stay-home notice periods from January to September 2021 to help employers manage the increased costs associated with the COVID-19 safety measures.

Since January, the government has put in place additional border measures, including limiting entry approvals for work pass holders and requiring newly arrived S Pass (special pass for professionals) and work permit holders to undergo on-arrival COVID-19 tests and serve stay-home notices, the Ministry of Manpower (MOM) said in a statement.

It said the decision to waive levies on foreign workers, including maids, during their stay-home notice periods from January to September 2021 will help employers manage the increased costs associated with the government's updated measures to reduce the risk of importing COVID-19 into the community".

"While employers have cooperated with these measures in the interest of public health, some have given feedback that these additional measures have also translated to increased costs," said the ministry.

For employers, who have already paid the levies for their workers during their stay-home notices in January and February, the waivers will be used to offset the foreign worker levy for June, which is payable in July.

Employers with workers serving stay-home notices from March to September will not be required to pay levies for the duration of the notices.

This includes limiting entry approvals for work pass holders and requiring newly arrived S Pass and Work Permit holders, including migrant domestic workers, to undergo on-arrival testing and serve a stay-home notice.

"While employers have cooperated with these measures in the interest of public health, some have given feedback that these additional measures have also translated to increased costs," the ministry added.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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First Published: Thu, April 01 2021. 12:40 IST
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