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Wall Street drops as big tech stocks including Apple, Amazon retreat

Microsoft Corp, Apple Inc and Amazon.com Inc dropped, weighing more than any other stocks on the S&P 500

Topics
Wall Street | Markets | Telecom stocks rally

Reuters 

bonds market, currencies, currency, RBI, yield
The S&P 500 financial and industrial sector indexes reached intra-day record highs. Most other S&P 500 sectors declined.

By Noel Randewich

(Reuters) - The Nasdaq ended sharply lower on Wednesday after investors sold high-flying technology shares and pivoted to sectors viewed as more likely to benefit from an economic recovery on the back of fiscal stimulus and vaccination programs.

Microsoft Corp, Apple Inc and Amazon.com Inc dropped, weighing more than any other stocks on the S&P 500.

The S&P 500 financial and industrial sector indexes reached intra-day record highs. Most other S&P 500 sectors declined.

The Russell 1000 value index, which leans heavily on economy-linked sectors, edged up, while its growth index, comprising large tech companies, lost ground.

"Today is the perfect encapsulation of the big theme we've been seeing in the past couple of months: The vaccine rollout is going well and the economy improving, and that is sending yields and rate expectations higher, which is hurting growth stocks," said Baird investment strategist Ross Mayfield, in Louisville, Kentucky.

Unofficially, the Dow Jones Industrial Average fell 119.08 points, or 0.38%, to 31,272.44, the S&P 500 lost 50.46 points, or 1.30%, to 3,819.83 and the Nasdaq Composite dropped 361.04 points, or 2.7%, to 12,997.75.

The U.S. economic recovery continued at a modest pace over the first weeks of this year, with businesses optimistic about the months to come and demand for housing "robust," but only slow improvement in the job market, the Federal Reserve reported.

While the vaccine distribution is expected to help the economy, data showed U.S. private employers hired fewer workers than expected in February, suggesting the labor market was struggling to regain speed.

Another report showed U.S. services industry activity unexpectedly slowed in February amid winter storms, while a measure of prices paid by companies for inputs surged to the highest level in nearly 12-1/2 years.

The U.S. 10-year Treasury yield ticked up to 1.47%, pressuring areas of the market with high valuations. It was still off last week's peak of above 1.61% that roiled stock as investors bet on rising inflation.

Rising interest rates disproportionately hurt high-growth tech companies because investors value them based on earnings expected years into the future, and high interest rates hurt the value of future earnings more than the value of earnings made in the short term.

"There is a definite headwind for equity if yields go above the 1.5% level with most investors keeping an eye on the pace of yield growth," said Michael Stritch, chief investment officer at BMO Wealth Management.

President Joe Biden's proposed $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief bill would phase out $1,400 payments to high-income Americans in a compromise with moderate Democratic senators, according to lawmakers and media reports.

Exxon Mobil Corp rose after the oil major unveiled plans to grow dividends and curb spending with projections that were less bold than previous years.

 

(Reporting by Noel Randewich in Oakland, California; Additional reporting by Shashank Nayar and Medha Singh in Bengaluru; Editing by Lisa Shumaker)

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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First Published: Thu, March 04 2021. 06:32 IST
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