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Income drop can take a toll on brain

ANI 

A drop in your salary does not only affect your pocket and budget but can trouble the mind too.

Young adults who experience annual income drops of 25 per cent or more may be prone to thinking problems and reduced brain in middle age, states a new study published in the Journal Neurology.

"Our results provide evidence that higher income volatility during peak earning years are associated with worse brain aging in middle age," said senior author Adina Zeki Al Hazzouri, PhD, assistant professor of epidemiology at Columbia Mailman School of Public

The study involved 3,287 people who were 23 to 35 years old at the start of the study and were enrolled in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults (CARDIA) study.

Participants reported their annual pre-tax household income every three to five years for 20 years, from 1990 to 2010.

Researchers examined how often income dropped as well as the percentage of change in income between 1990 and 2010.

Based on a number of income drops, participants fell into three groups: 1,780 people who did not have an income drop; 1,108 who had one drop of 25 per cent or more from the previously reported income; and 399 people who had two or more such drops.

Participants were given thinking and memory tests that measured how well they completed tasks and how much time it took to complete them.

Researchers found that people with two or more income drops had worse performances in completing tasks than people with no income drops. On average, they scored worse by 3.74 points or 2.8 per cent.

"For reference, this poor performance is greater than what is normally seen due to one year in aging, which is equivalent to scoring worse by only 0.71 points on average or 0.53 per cent," said first author Leslie Grasset, PhD, of the Inserm Research Center in Bordeaux, France.

Participants with more income drops also scored worse on how much time it took to complete some tasks.

Of the study group, 707 participants also had brain scans with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the beginning of the study and 20 years later to measure their total brain volume as well as the volumes of various areas of the brain.

When compared to people with no income drops, people with two or more income drops had smaller total brain volume. People with one or more income drops also had reduced connectivity in the brain.

One of the reasons according to researchers could be that people with lower or unstable income may have reduced access to high-quality care which may result in worse management of diseases like diabetes, or management of unhealthy behaviours such as smoking and drinking.

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

First Published: Tue, October 08 2019. 06:42 IST
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