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Indian warship undertakes refuelling with US Navy tanker in Arabian Sea

An Indian warship on Monday undertook refuelling with US Navy tanker USNS Yukon in northern Arabian Sea

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Indian Navy

Press Trust of India  |  New Delhi 

Indian navy
Representative image

An Indian warship on Monday undertook refuelling with US Navy tanker USNS Yukon in northern Arabian Sea using provisions of a defence agreement that allows the militaries of the two countries to work closely and use each other's bases.

"INS Talwar on mission based deployment in Northern Arabian sea undertook refuelling with US Navy Fleet Tanker USNS Yukon under LEMOA," an spokesperson said.

In 2016, India and the US inked the Logistics Exchange Memorandum of Agreement (LEMOA) that allows their militaries use each other's bases for repair and replenishment of supplies as well as provides for deeper cooperation.

India signed similar agreements with France, Singapore, Australia and Japan.

"The evolution apart from highlighting interoperability between and US Navy enables presence for enhancing maritime security," the spokesperson said.

The Indo-US defence ties have been on an upswing in the last few years.

The two countries signed another pact called COMCASA (Communications Compatibility and Security Agreement) in 2018 that provides for interoperability between the two militaries and sale of high-end technology from the US to India.

In July, the carried out a military exercise with a US Navy carrier strike group led by nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Nimitz off the coast of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. The USS Nimitz is the world's largest warship.

In the exercise with the US Navy, four frontline warships of the Indian Navy participated. The US carrier strike group was transiting through the Indian Ocean Region from the South China Sea.

The US Navy carrier strike group comprises USS Nimitz, Ticonderoga-class guided missile cruiser USS Princeton and Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyers USS Sterett and USS Ralph Johnson.

(Only the headline and picture of this report may have been reworked by the Business Standard staff; the rest of the content is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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First Published: Mon, September 14 2020. 23:24 IST