You are here: Home » PTI Stories » International » News
Business Standard

Afghanistan seeks explanation for Taliban office

AP  |  Kabul 

Afghanistan's government today said it is still waiting for a full explanation of how the Taliban were allowed to open an office in Qatar that was akin to an embassy, flying the militant group's flag and using its formal name from the years it ruled the country.

But Foreign Ministry spokesman Janan Mosazai said the Afghan government remains willing to send a peace delegation to Doha to negotiate with the Taliban once it has its explanation, as well as assurances that the office will be nothing more than a place for talks.

"The Afghan government remains fully committed to pursue a process of peace negotiations with the armed opposition, including the Taliban, but within the confines of the conditions and the principles and the assurances that we have established," Mosazai told reporters in Kabul.

The diplomatic incident served as a reminder of just how difficult a task lies ahead in getting all sides to the negotiating table after nearly 12 years of war.

The Taliban's office opened Tuesday in a ceremony broadcast on live television, accompanied by a simultaneous announcement that US officials would begin formal talks with Taliban representatives, which eventually would be joined by the Afghan government.

That raised hopes that the long-stalled peace process could finally begin.

But the Taliban's use of its old flag and a sign bearing the name of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan, which the movement used during its five-year rule that ended in 2001 with the US-led invasion, provoked outrage across party lines in Afghanistan.

Afghan President Hamid Karzai reacted sharply, suspending negotiations with the US over what presence international forces may keep in Afghanistan after 2014 and demanded the offending sign and flag be removed.

The Taliban has since complied after the Qatar government intervened. Both the US and the Qataris said the Taliban had agreed on the pre-approved name but violated the pact at the ribbon cutting ceremony.

Dear Reader,


Business Standard has always strived hard to provide up-to-date information and commentary on developments that are of interest to you and have wider political and economic implications for the country and the world. Your encouragement and constant feedback on how to improve our offering have only made our resolve and commitment to these ideals stronger. Even during these difficult times arising out of Covid-19, we continue to remain committed to keeping you informed and updated with credible news, authoritative views and incisive commentary on topical issues of relevance.
We, however, have a request.

As we battle the economic impact of the pandemic, we need your support even more, so that we can continue to offer you more quality content. Our subscription model has seen an encouraging response from many of you, who have subscribed to our online content. More subscription to our online content can only help us achieve the goals of offering you even better and more relevant content. We believe in free, fair and credible journalism. Your support through more subscriptions can help us practise the journalism to which we are committed.

Support quality journalism and subscribe to Business Standard.

Digital Editor

First Published: Sun, June 23 2013. 16:10 IST
RECOMMENDED FOR YOU