Genetically modified jute to come up for GEAC nod

India might see the commercialisation of (GM) in a month. Developed by the University of Calcutta, is set to be sent for commercial approval to the regulator, Genetic Engineering Approval Committee (GEAC), next month. If approved, will be the second crop of its kind after was approved for commercialisation in 2002.

is ready. The university is set to apply to the in a month,” said Swapan K Datta, deputy director general of the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), on the sidelines of a round-table on ‘Addressing challenges of food security’ organised by the Confederation of Indian Industry here on Monday.

Farmers expect that the success of will be replicated in jute. “With being a non-food crop, should not have any problem in approving it. The regulator has concerns only on food items,” Datta said.

Almost 30 per cent of the 250 million tonnes of foodgrains produced annually are packed in bags worth around Rs 6,000 crore.

Around 40 per cent of the bags produced are purchased by the through the Food Corporation of India, on behalf of different state food procuring agencies.

The country’s sector manufactures around 1.2 million tonnes of bags in a year. The installed capacity stands at nearly 1.5 million tonnes.

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Business Standard
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Business Standard

Genetically modified jute to come up for GEAC nod

Dilip Kumar Jha  |  Mumbai 

India might see the commercialisation of (GM) in a month. Developed by the University of Calcutta, is set to be sent for commercial approval to the regulator, Genetic Engineering Approval Committee (GEAC), next month. If approved, will be the second crop of its kind after was approved for commercialisation in 2002.

is ready. The university is set to apply to the in a month,” said Swapan K Datta, deputy director general of the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), on the sidelines of a round-table on ‘Addressing challenges of food security’ organised by the Confederation of Indian Industry here on Monday.



Farmers expect that the success of will be replicated in jute. “With being a non-food crop, should not have any problem in approving it. The regulator has concerns only on food items,” Datta said.

Almost 30 per cent of the 250 million tonnes of foodgrains produced annually are packed in bags worth around Rs 6,000 crore.

Around 40 per cent of the bags produced are purchased by the through the Food Corporation of India, on behalf of different state food procuring agencies.

The country’s sector manufactures around 1.2 million tonnes of bags in a year. The installed capacity stands at nearly 1.5 million tonnes.

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Genetically modified jute to come up for GEAC nod

India is likely to see commercialization of genetically modified (GM) jute in a month. Developed by the Kolkata University, GM jute is set to be sent for commercialization approval to the regulator - Genetically Engineering Approval Committee (GEAC), next month.If approved, GM jute would be the second crop of its kind after GM cotton was approved for commercialization in 2002 with huge success."The GM jute is ready. The Kolkata University is set to apply with GEAC for commercialization in a month," said Swapan K Datta, Deputy Director General of Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) on the sidelines of a roundtable on "Addressing Challenges of Food Security" organised by the Confederation of Indian Industry here on Monday.Farmers anticipate the success in cotton to be replicated in jute as well."Jute being a non - food crop, GEAC should not have any problem in approving it. The regulator has concerns only on food items," Datta said.Almost 30 per cent of the 250 million tonne . India might see the commercialisation of (GM) in a month. Developed by the University of Calcutta, is set to be sent for commercial approval to the regulator, Genetic Engineering Approval Committee (GEAC), next month. If approved, will be the second crop of its kind after was approved for commercialisation in 2002.

is ready. The university is set to apply to the in a month,” said Swapan K Datta, deputy director general of the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR), on the sidelines of a round-table on ‘Addressing challenges of food security’ organised by the Confederation of Indian Industry here on Monday.

Farmers expect that the success of will be replicated in jute. “With being a non-food crop, should not have any problem in approving it. The regulator has concerns only on food items,” Datta said.

Almost 30 per cent of the 250 million tonnes of foodgrains produced annually are packed in bags worth around Rs 6,000 crore.

Around 40 per cent of the bags produced are purchased by the through the Food Corporation of India, on behalf of different state food procuring agencies.

The country’s sector manufactures around 1.2 million tonnes of bags in a year. The installed capacity stands at nearly 1.5 million tonnes.
image
Business Standard
177 22

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